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The MAKING CHIPS Podcast for Manufacturing Leaders with Jason Zenger & Jim Carr

Welcome to MakingChips - We believe that manufacturing is challenging, but if you are connected to a community of leaders, you can elevate your skills, solve your problems and grow your business. Making Chips is a weekly podcast that will EQUIP and INSPIRE MANUFACTURING LEADERS to succeed in the challenging world of manufacturing. Our mission is for the METALWORKING NATION to Think Differently About Manufacturing In Order to Elevate their Game. Your hosts, Jason Zenger & Jim Carr, own manufacturing businesses and interview other leaders in the metalworking, machining, fabrication, tooling and machine tool industries. We have interviewed successful manufacturing CEOs you may have not heard of and also the biggest names in manufacturing like Titan Gilroy from Titans of CNC, John Saunders from NYC CNC, Mark Terryberry from Haas Automation and others from MakerCast, Sandvik Coromant, Autocrib and more. Think of us as your virtual community of manufacturing peers to help solve your toughest problems and grow your business. "Making Chips has provided a transparent approach to sharing within the manufacturing community and a modern platform to do so. Thank you both for taking the lead on moving our industry segment forward!" Patricia Miller - CEO & Visionary (Matrix IV) I really think what you guys are doing is a great, great thing for manufacturing. I have learned so much already from many of your episodes, and am so thrilled to have met people that get as revved up about manufacturing as I do! Cassandra Haupers – Vice President of Operations (Swiss Precision Machining) I love being able to experience what manufacturers are doing to promote culture and engage their team members and community. All of us are smarter than one of us. That is why I am part of the Making Chips tribe. Barry E. Walter, Jr. – Chief Operating Officer (Barry E. Walter, Sr. Co.) Finally, relevant manufacturing media that is actually entertaining! Dietmar Goellner – Chief Executive Officer (Advanced Machine & Engineering / Hennig) The more manufacturing companies we can get to think this way, the stronger our industry will be. Thank you for sharing! Jess Giudici – Manager, Talent and Culture I’m thankful to you for creating MakingChips for the Metalworking Nation so that Owners / Employees can strengthen their companies. Phil Sponsler – President (ORBITFORM) I love the podcast! It really serves to fill a void in the manufacturing world. I will admit I always feel a little more inspired. Jason Falk – Senior Application Engineer, CMTSE (HURCO) Thanks to all the great info on your podcasts and the website. Dave Lechleitner – Director of Solutions and Product Marketing (KEYEDIN) I really love what you guys are doing to advance the mfg industry in a way that really reaches the right audiences. Jeff Rizzie – Senior Manager-Business Development (Sandvik Coromant)
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Now displaying: 2015
Jun 4, 2015

That’s what Patricia Miller’s professional associates told her when she started investigating the possibility of taking over her family business after she’d already pursued and been successful at a career that included marketing, corporate leadership, and politics. Put yourself in her shoes and you’ll probably understand why they said what they did. She’d already experienced many perks that manufacturing leaders seldom do. Travel, posh offices, important connections - yet, she says her heart and her home pulled her back to take over her grandfather’s failing manufacturing business.

 

Welcome to Making Chips - THE podcast for manufacturing leaders and those involved in the manufacturing industry. Jim Carr and Jason Zenger bring you these shows week after week to help you keep on top of what’s happening in the manufacturing industry and to equip you to be the leader of your company as you desire to be.

 

Today the guys are talking with Patricia Miller in what is likely part one of a two part conversation. Patricia’s story is anything but typical. Though she was surrounded by the world of manufacturing as a child, spending time around her grandparent’s very successful machine shop, she never felt a draw to be “in” the family business. Her parents encouraged her to pursue her dreams and she did exactly that. But when her grandfather retired and his health failed, Patricia was at a juncture in her own life where she was choosing her next step. Suddenly, the option of taking over her grandparent’s business was a very real possibility that she’d not considered before.

 

In this episode of Making Chips you’re going to hear Patricia’s story of moving out of the corporate world to take over a manufacturing business that she admits was “stuck in the 70s” and on its last leg. It’s a story that testifies to the value and importance of long-time manufacturing operations and the leadership abilities of one amazing lady.

 

Grab your coffee, turn up the volume, and join Jim, Jason, and their guest Patricia Miller, CEO of Matrix IV as they discuss the process of moving a old-school manufacturing business into the modern era. On this episode of Making Chips.

 

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Here’s the outline of the conversation with Patricia

 

  • The story of Matrix IV, beginning with Patricia’s grandfather and grandmother

  • Patricia’s experience as a child being around the world of manufacturing

  • Patricia’s education led her into corporate leadership, politics, pharmaceuticals, and everything BUT manufacturing

  • Patricia’s opportunity to take over the leadership of Matrix IV and how she came to that decision

  • The realization that the company was stuck in the 1970s and what Patricia did about it

  • The first steps toward rejuvenating a tired, old business

  • How 400% growth since Patricia’s arrival is spurring the business forward

 

Links mentioned on this episode

 

Patricia’s company - Matrix IV - http://www.matrixiv.com/

 

An article from “Plastics News” describing what Patricia has done with Matrix IV - http://www.plasticsnews.com/article/20141212/NEWS/141219962/new-leader-gives-molder-a-spark

 

www.MakingChips.com - sign up for the Making Chips newsletter & podcast posts automatically (your information is never given to anyone else).

 

You can leave a comment or add to the discussion on this episode by visiting http://www.MakingChips.com/25

 

Or call us at 312-725-0245

Tweets you can use to tell others about the benefits of vending systems

 

Old-school manufacturing has to move into the modern age. It’s a new day http://www.MakingChips.com/?p=490

 

My family encouraged me not to come back and take over the family business http://www.MakingChips.com/?p=490

 

I had done the things I wanted to do and decided to consider taking over the family business http://www.MakingChips.com/?p=490

 

90% of the business had gone offshore before I took over the leadership http://www.MakingChips.com/?p=490

 

I decided to take over this family business that was 6 months from having no cash http://www.MakingChips.com/?p=490

May 27, 2015

It’s a manufacturing renaissance

 

Where do you typically find the best employees for your manufacturing company? How do you go about finding them? As you’ll hear from Jim and Jason’s stories in this podcast episode, everyone gets into the business through a different path. But the guys believe there’s a huge reservoir of future manufacturing leaders in High School students.

 

Why High School students? Because they represent an untapped, teachable, ready-to-train class of workers who are in need of what the manufacturing industry has to offer. The shortage of qualified, motivated manufacturing workers illustrates how shop owners have to look outside the normal places to find workers who can not only get busy making chips, but can also become the manufacturing leaders of tomorrow. High School students might just fit that bill for you.

 

A manufacturing renaissance is happening here and now. It’s once again possible for a person working in the manufacturing industry to earn an income that can comfortably support an entire family and establish that family in society for years to come. It’s not about the dusty, dirty shop floor of your grandfather’s day. It’s a new day, a new, technically challenging opportunity for those who are willing to seize it.

 

Another reason you should look to High Schools for your next manufacturing leader is because of how the manufacturing career path stacks up against college. The average college student will leave school without a specific skill set, will enter their chosen career field at the very bottom rung, and will do so with a load of financial debt that will take years to repay. By contrast, the manufacturing industry has high paying jobs available now that the average High School graduate can take advantage of. They’ll move up faster and avoid accumulating the debt often associated with higher education or specialized training (the training is paid for by their employer in many cases).

 

Rethink your hiring process. Reconsider the places to get your employees and the future leaders in your company. Your business needs quality employees who are motivated to move up the ladder of success and your local High School may be the very best place to find exactly that. The manufacturing renaissance is here. Will you be a part of it?



Here’s a teaser: the 6 qualities every future manufacturing leader must have

 

  1. The ability to pass a drug test.

  2. Dependability.

  3. A basic understanding of High School math.

  4. Communication skills - this one is HUGE!

  5. Familiarity with manufacturing (Mechanical aptitude).

  6. The desire to receive further training and certification.

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Here’s the outline of the conversation about

 

  • Jim and Jason’s personal paths into the manufacturing business and how they became manufacturing leaders.

  • Questions about a new or additional podcast. What do you think? Contact us to let us know. 312-725-0245

  • Jim and Jason travel to San Diego soon - connect with them to find out how you can connect while you’re there. 312-725-0245

  • The historical background of American prosperity and domestic stability as it relates to the manufacturing industry.

  • The very real shortage of qualified, motivated manufacturing leaders in the modern day.

  • Why Jim and Jason feel High School students are the ideal pool from which to draw your future manufacturing leaders.

  • Why the manufacturing industry demands a higher quality of worker.

  • 6 qualities every future manufacturing leader should have.

  • How the college path compares with the path into manufacturing.

  • How a High School grad could outpace college students through manufacturing, making better money and starting with little to no debt.

  • Jim’s pros and cons of hiring a High School student or graduate to become a manufacturing role of leadership.




Links mentioned on this episode

 

www.MakingChips.com - sign up for the Making Chips newsletter & podcast posts automatically (your information is never given to anyone else).

 

You can leave a comment or add to the discussion on this episode by visiting http://www.MakingChips.com/25

 

Or call us at 312-725-0245

May 20, 2015

If you are a manufacturing leader and you are not on LinkedIn, you don’t exist. - Jim Carr

 

That’s how strongly Jim feels about the power of having a presence on LinkedIn. It’s not just for job-seekers, it’s for anyone who wants to engage in dialogue and exchange of information in a business niche. Manufacturing is one of those and you might be surprised at the amount of information flowing back and forth behind the scenes through the LinkedIn network.

 

In this episode, Jim and Jason are going to walk you through 6 reasons you need to be on LinkedIn if you are (or want to be) a leader in the manufacturing industry. Some of these may seem like common sense, but others will surprise you.

 

Don’t neglect the conversations that are already happening on LinkedIn. You never know when you’re going to have the opportunity to get involved in a conversation, provide an answer to a question from your area of expertise, and as a result become known as a leader in your niche of the industry. That puts you on the radar of more people which eventually translates into sales, consulting and speaking opportunities, and who knows what else.

 

To top off the episode the guys are going to fill you in on 7 quick ways you can get started with LinkedIn (or get restarted) that will make it easy and smooth.

 

You owe it to yourself and to your company to create a strong LinkedIn profile and get involved in the conversations going on within the manufacturing industry on LinkedIn. It’s free, it takes only a small amount of time, and can be leveraged to great value in your manufacturing business. Listen in on this episode of MakingChips to find out how you can ramp up your LinkedIn activity and benefit your business.

.

Here’s the outline of the conversation about

 

  • Manufacturing news updates

  • Why LinkedIn is a powerful tool for manufacturing leaders

  • Relevancy matters - putting yourself on the radar of others in the industry

  • Connect with business partners

  • Building a digital “rolodex”

  • Create a platform for “thought leadership” in the manufacturing industry

  • Share what you do and create engagement with others in the industry

  • Drive traffic, inquiries, and sales

  • How to get started or restarted on LinkedIn (7 helpful tips)

 

Links mentioned on this episode

 

www.MakingChips.com - sign up for the Making Chips newsletter & podcast posts automatically (your information is never given to anyone else).

 

You can leave a comment or add to the discussion on this episode by visiting http://www.MakingChips.com/23

 

Or call us at 312- 725-0245

May 13, 2015

If you don’t know how to calculate SFPM, you’re losing money!

 

Every now and then we like to go to square one to discuss some fundamental issues surrounding the work done in the average machine shop. This episode is one of those episodes. Jim and Jason are talking SFPM - Surface Feet Per Minute in this episode. If you don’t understand what SFPM is, or if you don’t know how to calculate it, you need to listen in to this episode.

 

Properly calculating SFPM is a fundamental machine shop skill that enables you to do a handful of very important things:

 

  1. You’re able to optimize the work-flow of your shop.

  2. You do that by maximizing the rate at which you are making chips.

  3. This results in more money being made per minute.

  4. It also saves tools, materials, and time.

 

Every machinist, from novice to experienced must understand how to calculate Surface Feet Per Minute in order to do the very best job with every piece of material and with every tool. Without this knowledge they will wear out tools, destroy materials, and ultimately cost the company money, simply because of ignorance of this fundamental skill.

 

In this episode of Making Chips Jim and Jason also give some examples of how they go about managing the issue of SFPM in their shops, including the kind of conversations they have with employees about SFPM, how they can tell if SFPM has not been calculated accurately, and how to do the actual math to determine a proper SFPM number for the material and tools being used.

 

Yep, it’s basics. But the basics are important. So get ready to review (or learn for the first time) on this episode of Making Chips.

Here’s the outline of the conversation about corporate snapshots

  • Making Chips is going on the road the summer of 2015.

  • Why surface feet per minute is important for every machinist to understand.

  • How to find the SFPM for the materials and tools you are using.

  • The problems that can happen if you don’t understand SFPM.

  • How a misunderstanding of Surface Feet Per Minute can cost your company.

  • Calculating RPM for the material you are using.

  • How do you know if you’ve calculated SFPM accurately?

  • How Jim manages his employees regarding Surface Feet Per Minute.

  • The risks of SFPM mismatches.

  • Using the RPM to to calculate the feed rate based on the tool being used.

  • How IPR (inches per revolution) relates to SFPM.

  • The optimization of your workflow through proper use of SFPM in your shop.

  • Training entry level machinists to properly calculate Surface Feet Per Minute.

Links mentioned on this episode

 

www.MakingChips.com - sign up for the Making Chips newsletter & podcast posts automatically (your information is never given to anyone else).

 

You can leave a comment or add to the discussion on this episode by visiting http://www.MakingChips.com/23

 

Or call us at 312- 725-0245

Tweets you can use to tell others about the benefits of vending systems

 

If you’re not making chips, you’re not making money

 

If your machinists don’t know how to calculate surface feet per minute, you’re losing money

 

Why is surface feet per minute (SFPM) such an important calculation for your job shop?

 

How to find SFPM (surface feet per minute) in your machine shop.

 

How do you know if you’ve calculated SFPM (surface feet per minute) accurately?

May 6, 2015

 

A corporate snapshot that has nothing to do with a camera!

 

Shop owners know what they do because they do it every day. But how do you communicate your areas of specialty and expertise in a concise, powerful way so that your prospective clients are able to get it right off? That’s what a corporate snapshot is for.

 

In this episode of Making Chips, Jim and Jason invite 3 guests into the study who specialize in helping businesses create their very own corporate snapshot. Their guests are Jule Poulos (a previous guest from episode 19 of Making Chips), Ray Ziganto (another previous guest - episode 18 of Making Chips), and Jon Baklund (yet another previous guest - Making Chips episode 21).

 

Here’s a brief summary of 4 important questions that a corporate snapshot should answer:

 

  1. What we do as a company

  2. Who we are as a company

  3. Who we serve as a company

  4. Why we do what we do better

 

When you’re able to clearly and accurately define and express those 4 key issues about your company you unlock the power to do a couple of very powerful things…

  • You’re equipping your employees to become “sales people” through a clear vision of what you do as a company.

  • You’re able to more quickly identify your target clients and engage them in relevant conversations about their needs.

  • You’re better able to serve your clients through knowing exactly what your services can do to meet their needs.

 

This episode of Making Chips is full of practical, powerful advice about why you need your own corporate snapshot and how you can develop one. Listen in to the conversation to get started on your own corporate snapshot!

Here’s the outline of the conversation about corporate snapshots

 

  • Introduction of the guests on this episode: Julie, Ray, and Jim.

  • Metalworking tools.

  • The number one tool in your toolbox - a corporate snapshot.

  • The objective of a corporate snapshot.

  • How a corporate snapshot is the “home” for your elevator pitch.

  • 4 crucial components of a corporate snapshot - What we do - Who we are - Who we serve - Why we do it better.

  • Defining each of those 4 points in order to determine your marketing approach and target your message.

  • How a corporate snapshot empowers your employees to serve the customer.

Links mentioned on this episode

 

www.MakingChips.com - sign up for the Making Chips newsletter

 

http://www.bi-link.com

Tweets you can use to tell others about the benefits of vending systems

 

The number one tool in your toolbox is a corporate snapshot. Find out more on this episode.

 

A corporate snapshot empowers your employees to serve the customer.

 

Do you know the 4 crucial components of a corporate snapshot?

 

What is a corporate snapshot and why do you need one? On this episode of Making Chips


Briefly and powerfully tell the who, what, why of your company with a corporate snapshot

May 1, 2015

Today Jason and Jim are coming to you from Chicago, the “Windy City!” They are there because they’re chatting with Jon Baklund, a veteran tool and die maker who started in the manufacturing industry when he was 19. His father still works in the shop daily, and his wife works in the business as well - so it’s a true “family” business. His business, Baklund R & D is heavily involved in #d printing, which is a very intriguing new aspect of the manufacturing industry.

 

3D printing is a newer technology that is truly going to be a game-changer in the manufacturing industry. It’s one of those things that old-school folks may feel an urge to resist but our advice is to jump on board the train because it’s going to be moving out! Jon Baklund has one 3D printer in his shop, an environmentally controlled device that allows him to make virtually any shape part with any interior shape imaginable. He says you have to “think from the inside-out” when it comes to 3D printing, and we agree.

 

3D printing machines on the scale Jon uses are pretty pricey - his machine cost his company right around $160,000.00. But he says it’s well worth it. The specialty niche it has enabled him to carve out for himself has been a huge benefit to the company and when others begin to get on board the “3D printing train” he will be one of the veterans in the space.

 

We wrap up this episode with two “off topic” pieces that should give you some great value.

  1. Jon’s approach to the internet and social media activity from a business perspective (he’s great at it, so take some notes)

  2. How Jon and his wife are able to work together day in and day out without problems.

 

Listen in… you’ll enjoy this episode of Making Chips!

Here’s the outline of the episode

 

  • Introduction of Jon Baklund.

  • Manufacturing news - The U.S.A. is the “hotspot” for Aerospace manufacturing.

  • A 3D printing overview - from the perspective of an end-user (Jon)

  • How Jon is adding additional services to his company’s 3D printing

  • The cost of materials used in a 3D printing machine - it’s comparatively inexpensive!

  • Typical tolerance levels in 3D printing and how Jon is getting better tolerances through some custom modifications.

  • Thinking from the inside-out in 3D printing.

  • How Jon determines billing for 3D printing jobs.

  • What kind of oversight does a 3D printer require?

  • The importance of an environmentally controlled 3D printer.

  • What is the cost of a good 3D printing machine?

  • Jon’s approach to the internet and social media for business.

  • How Jon and his wife are able to work together day after day in the business.

  • Jim’s summary of his take-aways from this episode.

Links mentioned on this episode

 

www.MakingChips.com - sign up for the Making Chips newsletter

 

Jon’s website - www.jonbaklund.com

 

The work-holding device Jon has developed - www.jonbaklund.com/baklund-workholding-llc/

 

Tweets you can use to tell others about the benefits of vending systems

 

The U.S.A. is the “hotspot” for Aerospace manufacturing. Find out more in today’s news segment

 

You have to “think from the inside-out” when it comes to 3D printing

 

Did you know you can add additional services to 3D printing to maximize profit?

 

How 3D printing is revolutionizing the manufacturing industry: this episode of Making Chips

 

3D printing is the train of the future for manufacturing. Will you get on board?

 

SOCIAL MEDIA BLURBS

 

3D printing machines on the scale Jon uses are pretty pricey - his machine cost his company right around $160,000.00. But he says it’s well worth it. The specialty niche it has enabled him to carve out for himself has been a huge benefit to the company and when others begin to get on board the “3D printing train” he will be one of the veterans in the space. Listen to this episode of Making Chips to hear Jon’s story.

 

3D printing is a newer technology that is truly going to be a game-changer in the manufacturing industry. It’s one of those things that old-school folks may feel an urge to resist but our advice is to jump on board the train because it’s going to be moving out! Jon Baklund has one 3D printer in his shop, an environmentally controlled device that allows him to make virtually any shape part with any interior shape imaginable. He says you have to “think from the inside-out” when it comes to 3D printing, and we agree. Hear Jon’s story on this episode of Making Chips.

Apr 27, 2015

This is a hot topic edition where Jim is asking Jason about vending systems for the machine shop. You may have the impression that vending machines are just for the huge companies that crank out bazillions of widgets every day. But is that true? You’re going to find out that and a ton more about machine shop vending systems in this episode of Making Chips.

 

There are many misconceptions about vending systems and much resistance to the idea that a small shop could actually benefit from using them, but Jason Zenger knows better. He’s been able to place systems in a variety of settings, from small to large shops and has seen the benefit in even the smallest settings.

 

The reason for that is simple: The cost for vending systems has dropped as the technology has increased, making the power of vending systems more affordable for the little guy. Vending systems also enable you to keep track of tool and supply usage, which in turn tells you which employees are using what items so that you can make more informed adjustments to your systems or procedures as needed. Just imagine the savings of ensuring that every part is being used to its fullest capacity!

The major objectives of implementing a vending system in your shop:

 

Reduction in Spending

Increased Productivity

Increased Profitability

 

If it doesn’t make sense to you how those benefits come from installing and using a vending system in your shop, you need to listen in as Jason shares his experience as a representative for some vending system companies.

What the guys have to say about vending systems in this episode...

 

  • Major objectives of having a vending system in your shop - 3 powerful reasons.

  • The history of modern vending systems for the machine shop.

  • Aren’t vending systems geared more for huge manufacturers?

  • How to use vending systems in a small machine shop.

  • The sizes of vending machines and how to fit them into your shop.

  • Partnering with someone to help you manage the vending system so it doesn’t take over your schedule.

  • What types of supplies and tools can work with a vending system?

  • The process of bringing on a vending system and the importance of your vending partner.

  • Best practice software issues relating to your machine shop vending system.

  • The increasing popularity of vending systems.

  • 3 ways small companies can benefit from vending systems.

Listener questions

 

Jim and Jason are also happy to highlight questions from listeners on this episode. You can ask your question for this section of the podcast by call 1-312-725-0245 and leave your message on the recording.

 

Here’s today’s questions:

 

How important is it for a manufacturing company to have a clean, updated, and functional website?

 

What are buyers looking for when searching for a new supplier?

Links mentioned on this episode

 

www.MakingChips.com - sign up for the Making Chips newsletter

Something to look forward to…

 

Making Chips is going on the road! Stay tuned for more details.

Tweets you can use to tell others about the benefits of vending systems

 

Machine shop vending systems for the little guys… it’s not only possible, it’s a reality.

 

You don’t have to be a huge shop to afford and benefit from vending systems. Find out more in this episode.

 

Track your supplies and tools more effectively, and keep more profit on the bottom line.

 

Vending systems can reduce spending, increase productivity, and increase profit, even in small machine shops.

 

Your machine shop can function more smoothly and profitably by using a vending system. Find out how in this episode.

Apr 20, 2015

In this episode, we interview Julie Poulos about the brand image of your manufacturing company and why strategy is most important.  Being “the best kept secret” should NOT be your goal.  Julie tells us why starting with a new website or a new logo is NOT the right first step. Marketing Steps: 1. Competitive Analysis 2. Interviews 3. Online Analytics 4. Influencer Identification (Defining Your Buyer Types) 5. Develop the Plan Jim and I want you to be equipped when you are having a discussion with a firm to help you with marketing or your e-Strategy. In our Manufacturing News segment, we discuss multiple articles that cite a slow down in business for the beginning of 2015. About MakingChips MakingChips is a weekly podcast that will equip leaders in the metalworking manufacturing industry with valuable content to utilize in their career and business. What makes MakingChips unique is the fact that we are in the trenches getting dirty, leading, managing, designing, solving problems and pushing productivity.  MakingChips is here for us to report back from the factory floor to tell you what worked and what didn’t work…we tell you the mistakes we made and what we are excited to try.  We want to understand your problems and leverage this community to find a solution. Our goal is to equip manufacturing leaders and for those leaders to influence others in the manufacturing industry. From Jim: I'm the owner of CARR Machine & Tool, Inc., a 2nd generation high precision CNC machine shop utilizing 3 and 4 axis CNC Machining Centers. I’ve been at this a long time and

!
know machining like the back of my hand. Our company specialty is short to medium run jobs where we consistently hold tolerances of ± .0005 utilizing state-of-the-art tooling - which I get from Jason! From Jason: I'm the president of ZENGERS, a 3rd generation industrial supply company. I direct our team of metalworking specialists to decrease costs and increase productivity of our metalworking customers by applying the best tooling for the job and utilizing tool crib management technology. Subscribe and Follow Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MakingChipsPodcast Twitter: http://twitter.com/Making_Chips Instagram: http://instagram.com/MakingChips Website: http://MakingChips.com

Apr 13, 2015

In this episode, we interview Ray Zaganto, who created a new concept called “The Hardware Store” for reaching his customers by being innovative, thinking outside the box and finding the Alpha Engineer. Your "first place" is your home.  Your ”second place" is the workplace.  The “third place” is another location that connects you into a community and facilitates creative interaction. A lot of companies do not have the resources to outfit a standalone location and create a third place, but as Ray said: “Make Your Shop a Destination.” In our Manufacturing News segment, we discuss an episode of the TV show, “The Good Wife” in relation to an episode about 3D printing. About MakingChips MakingChips is a weekly podcast that will equip leaders in the metalworking manufacturing industry with valuable content to utilize in their career and business. What makes MakingChips unique is the fact that we are in the trenches getting dirty, leading, managing, designing, solving problems and pushing productivity.  MakingChips is here for us to report back from the factory floor to tell you what worked and what didn’t work…we tell you the mistakes we made and what we are excited to try.  We want to understand your problems and leverage this community to find a solution. Our goal is to equip manufacturing leaders and for those leaders to influence others in the manufacturing industry. From Jim: I'm the owner of CARR Machine & Tool, Inc., a 2nd generation high precision CNC machine shop utilizing 3 and 4 axis CNC Machining Centers. I’ve been at this a long time and know machining like the back of my hand. Our company specialty is short to medium run jobs where we consistently hold tolerances of ± .0005 utilizing state-of-the-art tooling - which I get from Jason! From Jason: I'm the president of ZENGERS, a 3rd generation industrial supply company. I direct our team of metalworking specialists to decrease costs and increase productivity of our metalworking customers by applying the best tooling for the job and utilizing tool crib management technology.

Apr 6, 2015

In this episode, we interview Michael Magliano, an industrial real estate broker from Cushman & Wakefield, about strategies for buying, selling and leasing industrial real estate. In our Manufacturing News segment, we discuss an article that asks the question: “What Do Manufacturing Workers Want From Their Employer.”

Mar 30, 2015

In this episode, we interview Ray Ziganto, President of Bi-Link, a global manufacturing company about his take-aways from the Crain’s Manufacturing Summit. • How does a manufacturing company stay on the leading edge? • How do you re-think manufacturing education? • Start with small steps. Cary Wood, President, Chief Executive Officer, Board Member of Sparton, talks about how to train and relate to the new workforce generation and why his turnover is so low. Dr. David Boulay, President of the Illinois Manufacturing Excellence Center (IMEC), discusses how public-private partnerships like IMEC support small and midsize manufacturing companies.  For more information on organizations like this, search for US Department of Commerce Manufacturing Extension Partnership (MEP). Dave Szczupak, Executive Vice President of Whirlpool, discusses the importance of local manufacturing companies to their supply chain and workforce development for the new generation.  Dave also tells us about the FIRST Robotics Competition for the youngest future generation of manufacturing. Jim Schultz, Director of the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity, discusses the importance of manufacturing to state commerce and how he is collaborating with his peers in other states. MakingChips.com/BiLink

Mar 23, 2015

What are the 3 most important actions that manufacturers can take now to improve their utilization of CAM software?  In this episode, we interview Matt Sump with ShopWare, one the top resellers of MasterCAM Software.  Jim answers the question: If you put 10 machinist in a shop and gave them a piece of material and a print, how many different ways will they produce that part? We discuss: • Latest trends in CAM software • How tool paths are calculated • Radial chip thinning • Most efficient amount of material removal • Surface feet per minute • Spindle speed • Utilizing a tooling database in CAM software • Machine utilization • Dynamic Machining versus High Speed Machining • Improving machining hydraulic manifolds using CAM software • Utilizing Dynamic Tool Paths • Automating existing processes with macros • Going beyond the basics by automating ! We briefly talk about the history of how MakingChips was started.
!! In our Manufacturing News segment, we discuss an article declaring that US manufacturing is going extinct.  I’m going to state it here: if you remove manufacturing from the US Economy, the United States will lose 30% of its GDP. ShopWare http://www.shopwareinc.com Matt Sump www.linkedin.com/in/mattsump/en

Mar 16, 2015

In this episode, Jim and I discuss how you can receive grant money to expand your manufacturing business.  We specifically discuss the Federal TAAF Grant that Jim was awarded, the process that he went through, the reimbursed expenses and how he coupled two programs together. Trade Adjustment Assistance for Firms  MakingChips.com/TAAF In our Manufacturing News segment, we discuss an article in the LA Times that states manufacturing is slower to grow in California than any other state in the USA.  The main factor for slow growth in California is the cost of doing business in the state. We have 2 questions for you: 1. Have you been successful receiving grant money?  If so, please share your story in the comments for this episode. 2. Would you like us to share more information associated with grant money, so you can take advantage of this under-utilized resource?

Mar 9, 2015

Roberts Swiss, a 60 year old manufacturer of Precision Swiss Machined Parts. Fernando gives

actionable advise to others who are not born into privilege and do not have a lot of resources,

but desire to seek advancement starting from the ground floor.

Fernando attributes his career success to:

• Taking advantage of learning from every possible resource - including the people who stood

in his way

• Tackling large projects

• Questioning the WHY behind business processes

• Working hard and doing the right thing

• Being the conduit of change

• Realizing challenges as opportunities for growth

• Bringing a culture of excellence

• Grace

In our Manufacturing News segment, we discuss an article that stated US Stocks started the

year mixed because manufacturing growth stalled in December, which proves that manufacturing

makes a huge difference to the US economy.

#ManufacturingMatters

Mar 2, 2015

When should the owners of a business start succession planning? NOW!

In our Manufacturing News segment, we discuss an article stating that slow manufacturing

growth doesn’t matter to the economy.

Feb 23, 2015

Should you implement Robotics into your company? In this episode we interview Brian Panek

from Panek Precision about robotics. We discuss the basics of robotics, how it has changed his

manufacturing and the culture of his company.

PanekPrecision.com

LinkedIn.com/in/brianpanek

Universal Robots

In our Manufacturing News segment, we discuss that MakingChips has been featured on iTunes

New & Noteworthy, which is a huge accomplishment. We would like to thank our listeners for

their feedback and support.

Feb 16, 2015

Who is in your network? In this episode we discuss the power of networking and how to properly

cultivate relationships in your industry.

Join MakingChips at the 3rd Annual Crain’s Midwest Manufacturers Summit.

Crain’s Manufacturing Summit

1. Networking is a long term process

2. Should you stalk them on LinkedIn?

3. When you think that it is time for the hard sell…wait.

4. Ask for an introduction.

5. Stay within a particular circle.

6. Don't forget follow up, but don’t hard sell.

7. Offer free advise.

8. Look for commonality.

9. Collect business cards.

10. Connect on LinkedIn.

11. Give before you expect to receive.

In our Manufacturing News segment, we discuss Forbes 30 under 30 in Manufacturing.

In our Metalworking Tools segment, we discuss Lenox Circtech Precision Circular Saw Blades.

More manufacturing companies are replacing band saw applications with with machines that

use cermet tipped circular saw blades.

Feb 9, 2015

What is the right method for getting paid for your work? This is a subject that both Jim and I

were reluctant to talk about; however, our goal is to bring the Metalworking Nation together

as a community to talk about topics that people are afraid to bring up.

What are your typical terms?

Do you offer payment via credit card?

Should you require a credit card for initial orders?

Do you have a defined credit terms policy?

If you are agreeing to an OEM contract that stipulates 90-120 day terms, are you considering

the financing rate and including that in the price that you charge for the product or service?

“Somebody has to pay it!”

What is our approach to collecting?

When do “put on the heat”?

Do you use collection agencies?

In our Manufacturing News segment, we discuss Workshops for Warriors, a non-profit that

transitions veterans into civilian jobs with a focus on manufacturing training.

In our Metalworking Tools segment, we discuss Z-Cut, a line of USA Made standard and highperformance

end mills, drills and taps.

Feb 2, 2015

Years ago, most businesses did not have a vision or a mission for their companies. It was simply

a matter of “blocking and tackling” your team through wins as the company grew (you buy

more machines as the customers come). Now, most businesses are caught up in the Wall

Street mindset that if you are not growing, you are dying.

Should every manufacturing company have this mindset or can we do better?

Do you have at least a loose vision or mission for your company?

Where do you see the company in 5 years or in 10 years?

How do you define staying where you are? - # of machines, sales, profit, employees, customers?

for JZ, a couple metrics: sales, profit, # of vending integration systems that we are serving,

customer retention

Do prospective customers look at your business in terms of size and gage whether they want

to do business with you?

The wrong ways to grow

1. Using supplier credit to grow and not having a financing plan for growth

• Instead: Have a financing plan for growth, talk to your bank, and learn about the proper

way to borrow money in order to achieve your goals.

2. Taking on low margin business to build your business or to just get in the door

• What happens?

• Can’t make money on the job

• Late on the job

!

• Quality is subpar

• Can’t do the job efficiently

End-users have become smarter about this and many are now working with their existing suppliers

to find out where they can partner and be strategic to remove costs out of the manufacturing

processes (another good subject for the future).

In our Manufacturing News segment, we discuss women in manufacturing (again). There is a

push in the Milwaukee market for welders. A 24 year old single mother with no intention to

get into manufacturing is pitched to pursue a manufacturing career. ”This is so cool, I am actually

creating my own art.” She is enjoying what she is creating, making good money and

able to support her family.

In our Metalworking Tools segment, we discuss the Widia Victory versus Value lines and why a

company would utilize this model.

Jan 26, 2015

The image is that manufacturing is a dirty, physical, turning-cranks, labor intensive job, but the facts is that the machining industry is one of the most technological forward and innovative industries. In this seventh episode, Jim and I discuss how the industry has changed along with machine and software technology. Jim tells an interesting stories about when his dad

ran the shop and one of his machinist screwed up a part, which you can’t do nowadays and I throw out how old I was when Jim started in the industry.

More high schools are teaching manufacturing skills.

In our Manufacturing News segment, we discuss how Wheeling High School (Wheeling, IL) has been turning out hire-ready manufacturing students for the last six years. Part of Germany’s education model is that a 15 year old will enter into an internship whereby manufacturing is one of the top choices.

In our Metalworking Tools segment, we discuss the advantages of thread milling: control the size, breakage, tool life.

Jan 19, 2015

Are international standards important for your company or your partners? In this

sixth episode, Jim and I discuss standards and the impact of ISO on his company. We discuss

the specific standards of ISO 9001 (Quality Management), ISO 14001 (Environmental Management)

& OHSAS 18001 (Health & Safety).

Fun Facts: ISO, the International Organization of Standards, has 3 official languages (English,

French & Russian). ISO is derived from the Greek isos, meaning equal. The International Organization

for Standards is headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland and is associated with the

United Nations.

Should you hire an outside consultant to outline a plan and help you along the process?

What can ISO do for your business culture?

Every company is going to be different, but Jim discusses his annual cost of ISO renewal and

the amount of time that his staff spends on ISO per week.

How does the ISO champion interact with other employees?

In our Manufacturing News segment, we discuss the Multi Jet Fusion Printer, a 3D printer

from HP.

In our Metalworking Tools segment, we discuss straight flute reamers versus spiral flute

reamers and left hand versus right hand spiral flute reamers.

Jan 12, 2015

Is there a plan in place at your company if a top employee, such as the president or owner

dies? Episode five is the first in a new interview format on MakingChips. In this fifth episode,

we talk to Stacey Bales about her story of taking over as President of Bales Mold Service (recently

rebranded as Bales Metal Surface Solutions).

The first reaction from the bank is “How are we going to liquidate?”

Who takes over when multiple family members are involved and no succession plan has been

setup? Major issues arise, such as trust among family members - when there is no succession

plan, family members will fight out their new roles instead of moving into the proper roles

right away. The family needs to establish that they are all on the same team and not out for

themselves.

“Be very transparent with the person that you believe is coming up.” The owner of every

manufacturing company should be transparent about how they want to handle the succession

of their company and have a vision about where they want the company to go.

Stacey Bales is the 2nd generation owner and President of Bales Metal Surface Solutions. Bales

provides engineered coating and finishes to mold makers and OEMs. They have locations in

Illinois and Texas. In addition, Stacey is on the Board of Directors of the TMA (Technology and

Manufacturing Association) and President of AESF (American Electro & Surface Finishers).

In our Manufacturing News segment, we discuss a news article about the City of Atlanta. They

are short on manufacturing skilled labor resulting in six figure incomes for certain positions.

In our Metalworking Tools segment, we discuss Southwestern Industries (CNC Technology for

Small Lot Machining). Southwestern machines are intended to produce small lots of parts, so

you can go from programming to producing parts much quicker than traditional CNC lathes

and mills with easy to use ProtoTRAK programming.

 

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