Info

MakingChips | Equipping Manufacturing Leaders

MakingChips is a weekly podcast that will equip leaders in the metalworking manufacturing industry with valuable content to utilize in their career and business.
RSS Feed
MakingChips | Equipping Manufacturing Leaders
2017
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2016
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2015
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2014
December


All Episodes
Archives
Now displaying: May, 2015
May 27, 2015

It’s a manufacturing renaissance

 

Where do you typically find the best employees for your manufacturing company? How do you go about finding them? As you’ll hear from Jim and Jason’s stories in this podcast episode, everyone gets into the business through a different path. But the guys believe there’s a huge reservoir of future manufacturing leaders in High School students.

 

Why High School students? Because they represent an untapped, teachable, ready-to-train class of workers who are in need of what the manufacturing industry has to offer. The shortage of qualified, motivated manufacturing workers illustrates how shop owners have to look outside the normal places to find workers who can not only get busy making chips, but can also become the manufacturing leaders of tomorrow. High School students might just fit that bill for you.

 

A manufacturing renaissance is happening here and now. It’s once again possible for a person working in the manufacturing industry to earn an income that can comfortably support an entire family and establish that family in society for years to come. It’s not about the dusty, dirty shop floor of your grandfather’s day. It’s a new day, a new, technically challenging opportunity for those who are willing to seize it.

 

Another reason you should look to High Schools for your next manufacturing leader is because of how the manufacturing career path stacks up against college. The average college student will leave school without a specific skill set, will enter their chosen career field at the very bottom rung, and will do so with a load of financial debt that will take years to repay. By contrast, the manufacturing industry has high paying jobs available now that the average High School graduate can take advantage of. They’ll move up faster and avoid accumulating the debt often associated with higher education or specialized training (the training is paid for by their employer in many cases).

 

Rethink your hiring process. Reconsider the places to get your employees and the future leaders in your company. Your business needs quality employees who are motivated to move up the ladder of success and your local High School may be the very best place to find exactly that. The manufacturing renaissance is here. Will you be a part of it?



Here’s a teaser: the 6 qualities every future manufacturing leader must have

 

  1. The ability to pass a drug test.

  2. Dependability.

  3. A basic understanding of High School math.

  4. Communication skills - this one is HUGE!

  5. Familiarity with manufacturing (Mechanical aptitude).

  6. The desire to receive further training and certification.

.

Here’s the outline of the conversation about

 

  • Jim and Jason’s personal paths into the manufacturing business and how they became manufacturing leaders.

  • Questions about a new or additional podcast. What do you think? Contact us to let us know. 312-725-0245

  • Jim and Jason travel to San Diego soon - connect with them to find out how you can connect while you’re there. 312-725-0245

  • The historical background of American prosperity and domestic stability as it relates to the manufacturing industry.

  • The very real shortage of qualified, motivated manufacturing leaders in the modern day.

  • Why Jim and Jason feel High School students are the ideal pool from which to draw your future manufacturing leaders.

  • Why the manufacturing industry demands a higher quality of worker.

  • 6 qualities every future manufacturing leader should have.

  • How the college path compares with the path into manufacturing.

  • How a High School grad could outpace college students through manufacturing, making better money and starting with little to no debt.

  • Jim’s pros and cons of hiring a High School student or graduate to become a manufacturing role of leadership.




Links mentioned on this episode

 

www.MakingChips.com - sign up for the Making Chips newsletter & podcast posts automatically (your information is never given to anyone else).

 

You can leave a comment or add to the discussion on this episode by visiting http://www.MakingChips.com/25

 

Or call us at 312-725-0245

May 20, 2015

If you are a manufacturing leader and you are not on LinkedIn, you don’t exist. - Jim Carr

 

That’s how strongly Jim feels about the power of having a presence on LinkedIn. It’s not just for job-seekers, it’s for anyone who wants to engage in dialogue and exchange of information in a business niche. Manufacturing is one of those and you might be surprised at the amount of information flowing back and forth behind the scenes through the LinkedIn network.

 

In this episode, Jim and Jason are going to walk you through 6 reasons you need to be on LinkedIn if you are (or want to be) a leader in the manufacturing industry. Some of these may seem like common sense, but others will surprise you.

 

Don’t neglect the conversations that are already happening on LinkedIn. You never know when you’re going to have the opportunity to get involved in a conversation, provide an answer to a question from your area of expertise, and as a result become known as a leader in your niche of the industry. That puts you on the radar of more people which eventually translates into sales, consulting and speaking opportunities, and who knows what else.

 

To top off the episode the guys are going to fill you in on 7 quick ways you can get started with LinkedIn (or get restarted) that will make it easy and smooth.

 

You owe it to yourself and to your company to create a strong LinkedIn profile and get involved in the conversations going on within the manufacturing industry on LinkedIn. It’s free, it takes only a small amount of time, and can be leveraged to great value in your manufacturing business. Listen in on this episode of MakingChips to find out how you can ramp up your LinkedIn activity and benefit your business.

.

Here’s the outline of the conversation about

 

  • Manufacturing news updates

  • Why LinkedIn is a powerful tool for manufacturing leaders

  • Relevancy matters - putting yourself on the radar of others in the industry

  • Connect with business partners

  • Building a digital “rolodex”

  • Create a platform for “thought leadership” in the manufacturing industry

  • Share what you do and create engagement with others in the industry

  • Drive traffic, inquiries, and sales

  • How to get started or restarted on LinkedIn (7 helpful tips)

 

Links mentioned on this episode

 

www.MakingChips.com - sign up for the Making Chips newsletter & podcast posts automatically (your information is never given to anyone else).

 

You can leave a comment or add to the discussion on this episode by visiting http://www.MakingChips.com/23

 

Or call us at 312- 725-0245

May 13, 2015

If you don’t know how to calculate SFPM, you’re losing money!

 

Every now and then we like to go to square one to discuss some fundamental issues surrounding the work done in the average machine shop. This episode is one of those episodes. Jim and Jason are talking SFPM - Surface Feet Per Minute in this episode. If you don’t understand what SFPM is, or if you don’t know how to calculate it, you need to listen in to this episode.

 

Properly calculating SFPM is a fundamental machine shop skill that enables you to do a handful of very important things:

 

  1. You’re able to optimize the work-flow of your shop.

  2. You do that by maximizing the rate at which you are making chips.

  3. This results in more money being made per minute.

  4. It also saves tools, materials, and time.

 

Every machinist, from novice to experienced must understand how to calculate Surface Feet Per Minute in order to do the very best job with every piece of material and with every tool. Without this knowledge they will wear out tools, destroy materials, and ultimately cost the company money, simply because of ignorance of this fundamental skill.

 

In this episode of Making Chips Jim and Jason also give some examples of how they go about managing the issue of SFPM in their shops, including the kind of conversations they have with employees about SFPM, how they can tell if SFPM has not been calculated accurately, and how to do the actual math to determine a proper SFPM number for the material and tools being used.

 

Yep, it’s basics. But the basics are important. So get ready to review (or learn for the first time) on this episode of Making Chips.

Here’s the outline of the conversation about corporate snapshots

  • Making Chips is going on the road the summer of 2015.

  • Why surface feet per minute is important for every machinist to understand.

  • How to find the SFPM for the materials and tools you are using.

  • The problems that can happen if you don’t understand SFPM.

  • How a misunderstanding of Surface Feet Per Minute can cost your company.

  • Calculating RPM for the material you are using.

  • How do you know if you’ve calculated SFPM accurately?

  • How Jim manages his employees regarding Surface Feet Per Minute.

  • The risks of SFPM mismatches.

  • Using the RPM to to calculate the feed rate based on the tool being used.

  • How IPR (inches per revolution) relates to SFPM.

  • The optimization of your workflow through proper use of SFPM in your shop.

  • Training entry level machinists to properly calculate Surface Feet Per Minute.

Links mentioned on this episode

 

www.MakingChips.com - sign up for the Making Chips newsletter & podcast posts automatically (your information is never given to anyone else).

 

You can leave a comment or add to the discussion on this episode by visiting http://www.MakingChips.com/23

 

Or call us at 312- 725-0245

Tweets you can use to tell others about the benefits of vending systems

 

If you’re not making chips, you’re not making money

 

If your machinists don’t know how to calculate surface feet per minute, you’re losing money

 

Why is surface feet per minute (SFPM) such an important calculation for your job shop?

 

How to find SFPM (surface feet per minute) in your machine shop.

 

How do you know if you’ve calculated SFPM (surface feet per minute) accurately?

May 6, 2015

 

A corporate snapshot that has nothing to do with a camera!

 

Shop owners know what they do because they do it every day. But how do you communicate your areas of specialty and expertise in a concise, powerful way so that your prospective clients are able to get it right off? That’s what a corporate snapshot is for.

 

In this episode of Making Chips, Jim and Jason invite 3 guests into the study who specialize in helping businesses create their very own corporate snapshot. Their guests are Jule Poulos (a previous guest from episode 19 of Making Chips), Ray Ziganto (another previous guest - episode 18 of Making Chips), and Jon Baklund (yet another previous guest - Making Chips episode 21).

 

Here’s a brief summary of 4 important questions that a corporate snapshot should answer:

 

  1. What we do as a company

  2. Who we are as a company

  3. Who we serve as a company

  4. Why we do what we do better

 

When you’re able to clearly and accurately define and express those 4 key issues about your company you unlock the power to do a couple of very powerful things…

  • You’re equipping your employees to become “sales people” through a clear vision of what you do as a company.

  • You’re able to more quickly identify your target clients and engage them in relevant conversations about their needs.

  • You’re better able to serve your clients through knowing exactly what your services can do to meet their needs.

 

This episode of Making Chips is full of practical, powerful advice about why you need your own corporate snapshot and how you can develop one. Listen in to the conversation to get started on your own corporate snapshot!

Here’s the outline of the conversation about corporate snapshots

 

  • Introduction of the guests on this episode: Julie, Ray, and Jim.

  • Metalworking tools.

  • The number one tool in your toolbox - a corporate snapshot.

  • The objective of a corporate snapshot.

  • How a corporate snapshot is the “home” for your elevator pitch.

  • 4 crucial components of a corporate snapshot - What we do - Who we are - Who we serve - Why we do it better.

  • Defining each of those 4 points in order to determine your marketing approach and target your message.

  • How a corporate snapshot empowers your employees to serve the customer.

Links mentioned on this episode

 

www.MakingChips.com - sign up for the Making Chips newsletter

 

http://www.bi-link.com

Tweets you can use to tell others about the benefits of vending systems

 

The number one tool in your toolbox is a corporate snapshot. Find out more on this episode.

 

A corporate snapshot empowers your employees to serve the customer.

 

Do you know the 4 crucial components of a corporate snapshot?

 

What is a corporate snapshot and why do you need one? On this episode of Making Chips


Briefly and powerfully tell the who, what, why of your company with a corporate snapshot

May 1, 2015

Today Jason and Jim are coming to you from Chicago, the “Windy City!” They are there because they’re chatting with Jon Baklund, a veteran tool and die maker who started in the manufacturing industry when he was 19. His father still works in the shop daily, and his wife works in the business as well - so it’s a true “family” business. His business, Baklund R & D is heavily involved in #d printing, which is a very intriguing new aspect of the manufacturing industry.

 

3D printing is a newer technology that is truly going to be a game-changer in the manufacturing industry. It’s one of those things that old-school folks may feel an urge to resist but our advice is to jump on board the train because it’s going to be moving out! Jon Baklund has one 3D printer in his shop, an environmentally controlled device that allows him to make virtually any shape part with any interior shape imaginable. He says you have to “think from the inside-out” when it comes to 3D printing, and we agree.

 

3D printing machines on the scale Jon uses are pretty pricey - his machine cost his company right around $160,000.00. But he says it’s well worth it. The specialty niche it has enabled him to carve out for himself has been a huge benefit to the company and when others begin to get on board the “3D printing train” he will be one of the veterans in the space.

 

We wrap up this episode with two “off topic” pieces that should give you some great value.

  1. Jon’s approach to the internet and social media activity from a business perspective (he’s great at it, so take some notes)

  2. How Jon and his wife are able to work together day in and day out without problems.

 

Listen in… you’ll enjoy this episode of Making Chips!

Here’s the outline of the episode

 

  • Introduction of Jon Baklund.

  • Manufacturing news - The U.S.A. is the “hotspot” for Aerospace manufacturing.

  • A 3D printing overview - from the perspective of an end-user (Jon)

  • How Jon is adding additional services to his company’s 3D printing

  • The cost of materials used in a 3D printing machine - it’s comparatively inexpensive!

  • Typical tolerance levels in 3D printing and how Jon is getting better tolerances through some custom modifications.

  • Thinking from the inside-out in 3D printing.

  • How Jon determines billing for 3D printing jobs.

  • What kind of oversight does a 3D printer require?

  • The importance of an environmentally controlled 3D printer.

  • What is the cost of a good 3D printing machine?

  • Jon’s approach to the internet and social media for business.

  • How Jon and his wife are able to work together day after day in the business.

  • Jim’s summary of his take-aways from this episode.

Links mentioned on this episode

 

www.MakingChips.com - sign up for the Making Chips newsletter

 

Jon’s website - www.jonbaklund.com

 

The work-holding device Jon has developed - www.jonbaklund.com/baklund-workholding-llc/

 

Tweets you can use to tell others about the benefits of vending systems

 

The U.S.A. is the “hotspot” for Aerospace manufacturing. Find out more in today’s news segment

 

You have to “think from the inside-out” when it comes to 3D printing

 

Did you know you can add additional services to 3D printing to maximize profit?

 

How 3D printing is revolutionizing the manufacturing industry: this episode of Making Chips

 

3D printing is the train of the future for manufacturing. Will you get on board?

 

SOCIAL MEDIA BLURBS

 

3D printing machines on the scale Jon uses are pretty pricey - his machine cost his company right around $160,000.00. But he says it’s well worth it. The specialty niche it has enabled him to carve out for himself has been a huge benefit to the company and when others begin to get on board the “3D printing train” he will be one of the veterans in the space. Listen to this episode of Making Chips to hear Jon’s story.

 

3D printing is a newer technology that is truly going to be a game-changer in the manufacturing industry. It’s one of those things that old-school folks may feel an urge to resist but our advice is to jump on board the train because it’s going to be moving out! Jon Baklund has one 3D printer in his shop, an environmentally controlled device that allows him to make virtually any shape part with any interior shape imaginable. He says you have to “think from the inside-out” when it comes to 3D printing, and we agree. Hear Jon’s story on this episode of Making Chips.

1