Info

MakingChips | Equipping Manufacturing Leaders

MakingChips is a weekly podcast that will equip leaders in the metalworking manufacturing industry with valuable content to utilize in their career and business.
RSS Feed Subscribe in Apple Podcasts
MakingChips | Equipping Manufacturing Leaders
2019
January


2018
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2017
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2016
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2015
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2014
December


All Episodes
Archives
Now displaying: Page 1
Jan 18, 2019

Streamlining and optimizing your company’s hiring and onboarding processes can be difficult and sometimes daunting. Hosts Jim Carr and Jason Zenger bring helpful and common questions to the table with guest speaker Jessica Giudici - manager of organizational development at Smalley. Jess gives practical and engaging advice on how to approach your hiring process and create efficient, job-unique procedures for finding the best individuals for your company’s needs. Learn how staying true to your company’s vision and values can help save you time in the hiring process on this episode of the MakingChips podcast!

Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact

The hiring process: taking it back to the roots

Where should manufacturing leaders start when assessing their company’s hiring process? Jess emphasizes that understanding who you are as a company is key. Branding isn’t just something that you talk about with the marketing team; who you are should permeate everything you do, including hiring and onboarding. Identify and establish who you are as an employer. What is your commitment to your employees and team members? Jess explains that when you understand who you are as a company and employer, it helps narrow down who you want to join your team and who will make a good fit.

Create an optimized process centered around your company’s values

Recognizing your identity is just the first step. The next is understanding who your audience is when marketing an open position. A cookie cutter approach to hiring won’t attract the unique candidates that you want to see applying for your specific job opportunities. From there, you can hone down which platform you will use to market the job. After you have identified who it is you need - and for what job - you need to walk through what the first conversation will look like. Put yourself in the candidate’s shoes and think about what they will find and feel when they walk through the door at the first meeting. Are your processes outdated? Is it all paper and work? Is it boring? Think again about who you are as a company and create an atmosphere that highlights your strengths, values, and vision.

Interviewing: a process of identification

Jess discusses why speed to hire must be executed within the framework of quality over quantity. You don’t need 10 or 20 candidates; you need one excellent candidate. Create an interview process for your company that focuses on finding the right fit. Jim and Jason agree, saying that making sure the candidate is aligned with your core values is essential. Jess recommends training your hiring managers to effectively engage the candidate and to listen to the entire team’s perceptions. She discourages the 2 on 1 interview, explaining that it is needlessly intimidating to the candidate, and it is easy for the emphasis of the interview to shift from the candidate to the communication between interviewers. To learn more about the best practices for interviewing and whether or not money should be discussed in the process, listen to the full episode!

Breathing life into your onboarding process

Having an optimized onboarding process is just as important as having solid hiring procedures. Jess recommends walking through the goals and desired impressions of the onboarding experience. She reveals that it only takes about 45 days for a new employee to decide whether or not they wish to stay with a company long-term or begin looking for new opportunities. The first few months are vital! Training your leadership on how to engage effectively with new recruits will quicken learning and make for a positive experience for all participants. The focus should be on creating an environment in which the new employee can thrive as a learner. For more excellent tips on how to streamline your manufacturing company’s hiring and onboarding processes, listen to the entire episode! Jim and Jason encourage you to not become overwhelmed but to take things one step at a time, leading to effective success.

Here’s The Good Stuff!

  • Carr Machine & Tool secured a finalists position for some exciting awards!
  • Bill Gates invests in carbon-free steel manufacturing.
  • Guest speaker, Jessica Giudici - a MakingChips veteran.
  • The importance of a streamlined hiring and onboarding process.
  • Where to start in assessing your company’s hiring process.
  • Creating a step-by-step process that highlights your company’s vision and values.
  • Best practices for the interviewing process.
  • How to optimize the onboarding process and boost long-term employee retention.
  • Don’t be overwhelmed! Improve one step at a time.

Tools & Takeaways

This Week’s Superstar Guest: Jess Giudici

Connect With MakingChips

Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify

Jan 12, 2019

The word is out - the economy is changing, and you should probably start planning for a recession. MakingChips hosts Jason Zenger and Jim Carr help take the intimidation out of a looming recessional period by offering some practical advice based on their own personal experiences with leading manufacturing businesses during economic recessions. Learn how you can get a head start in your business and personal life by making just a few - and not too frightening - changes to your company’s lifestyle in this important episode of the MakingChips podcast!

Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact

Preparation prevents poor performance

Jim and Jason explain that recessions in the economy are inevitable. While we can’t ever know for sure when or how harshly recessions will hit, we can take steps to prepare for the strike. There are difficulties in every season of the economy - even in the good times. Recessions simply provide a different set of challenges that can be weathered more effectively by those who plan accordingly. Jim and Jason point out that the manufacturing economy is at a booming national high, which makes now the perfect time to save and plan for a dive.

The money game: where to spend and where to save

A looming recession raises numerous questions on how to best manage company and personal finances. Jim and Jason give helpful starting points for long-term effectiveness, beginning with the important step of keeping your debt low and under control. The probability of needing to cut job margins is high, and there will not be as much room in the profit margin to play with. Keeping debt thin will leave more room for necessary funding. Saving money is also vital. Jim and Jason recommend bulking up the savings account to create a buffer for yourself and your company for when times get tight. Saving now can help counter the possible need to cut employment levels. A third way you can take precautions now is to be prudent with your company and personal spending. Determine what you can cut out of your business and personal spending and make a budget. Learn how sacrificing now can save you later by listening to the full episode!

Building up your team and your machine

Don’t leave your employees and team members in the dark on what is happening in the economy and of the changes that you will likely need to make in your business when the recession hits. Encourage your team to not overextend themselves and to prepare themselves. Build up morale by explaining the cyclical nature of the economy. Recessions don’t last forever! Give them tools to help them prepare (such as this podcast!). Refrain from purchasing new machinery leading up to the recession and during. Invest in your current machinery by making necessary repairs and keeping up on maintenance. Today’s machinery will be tomorrow’s money-makers. Invest now while you have the monetary means.

Seizing the opportunity in a recession

Jim and Jason point out that opportunity is available in every season of the economy. Diversify your customer base now so that when things get rough, your company’s well-being won’t be compromised by the collapse of just one or two of your clients. Not all of your customers will be affected by the recession in the same way. When the recession does hit, don’t sit back and wait it out. Look for ways to build your business by observing what is available when other companies are struggling. An example Jim and Jason give is acquiring your competition’s businesses or bringing them onto your team. Look for ways you can help yourself by helping others. For more tips and tricks on how to lessen the pain of a recession and effectively prepare your manufacturing business for the coming times, listen to the full episode!

Here’s The Good Stuff!

  • A recession is coming.
  • Exciting news about national growth in manufacturing and Jim’s new trunnion table.
  • Changes in the economy call for changes of plan: how to be prepared.
  • Why you should keep debt low.
  • Why you need to diversify your customer base.
  • Communication with your team is vital.
  • The importance of maintaining your current machinery and equipment.
  • Building your savings account so it can do its job.
  • How being prudent in company and personal spending NOW will save you later.
  • Opportunities are abundant - even in a recession.

Connect With MakingChips

Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify

Jan 4, 2019

In this episode of MakingChips, Jason Zenger and Jim Carr introduce a new team member, Christine Schmitz - an experienced editor and writer who explains why storytelling matters to manufacturers and their businesses. Having long been connected to the manufacturing world through her husband, Dr. Tony Schmitz (featured in a previous episode), Christine has an intensely valuable viewpoint on how and why it is important for leaders to be able to tell good stories. “Communications is the foundation of who I am,” Christine shares. To communicate well, one must build relationship, and relationship is founded in the sharing of stories. Want to know what makes a great story and how knowing how to write one can boost your game in the manufacturing business? Listen to the whole episode!

Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact

Bringing process and art together

Just as in manufacturing, there is a process of writing a good story. Christine shares the process of how to take your story and vision and work it into a compelling and useful tool.

  • The process begins with the reader - the intended audience. Identify who your audience is and ask, “What do they want to know that I can share?”
  • Identify what expertise you can share with your audience by knowing what problem you solve through your business or work. Your audience’s interest lies in the application of your knowledge and profession.
  • Find an editor or another person you trust to give you feedback on your writing. Another set of eyes is invaluable and a vital part to the success of your story.
  • Always reread your writing. Trust your professional intuition and make sure that your work, vision, and story is conveyed honestly and effectively.

Creating a shared vision through your story

Christine points out that most people only think of themselves when communicating. To build a lasting and effective relationship, however, one must think of the other person - in this case, the manufacturing leader must think of his or her business, employees, customers, and possible recruits. All of these categories are readers of your story who want to know, “What’s in it for me?” It can often be difficult for manufacturers to share the story of their work, the challenge of their highly technical fields, or the processes they use. Christine reveals that relevance is key to building the bridge between writer and reader. “When it’s hard to explain what you are doing to another person,” she explains, “it dramatically impacts the relationship you can have with them.” To learn how to best create a shared vision through your story, listen to the full episode!

Connecting yourself and your audience through problem-solving

Tailoring your message to your audience is vital for the survival of your story. But how should you convey your manufacturing story to capture your audience? Christine points out that manufacturing is something that permeates everybody’s lives. Manufacturers produce something tangible every day, whereas most other people do not. People want to know how and why you create the things you do - as long as the application applies to them. Your audience wants to know what the problem is that you solve and how and why you solve that problem. Connect yourself with your audience by concentrating your story on the end result of your work.

Quality is always better than quantity

Christine warns against the temptation to simply flood your readers and audience with information that they may not be interested in or need. Always take quality over quantity. One way you can ensure the quality of your writing is through an editor. While your professional expertise is needed to correctly tell the story, an editor can help you build the strongest and most effective bridge between your story and your audience. Also, realize that there is no one way to write. Find a process that works for you and don’t be afraid to change that process when it’s not working. To learn more about writing as a process and why storytelling matters to your manufacturing business and skillset, listen to the full episode!

Here’s The Good Stuff!

  • Manufacturing is storytelling.
  • Manufacturing News: changes in tariffs.
  • Introducing the new MakingChips member: Christine Schmitz.
  • Why is it important to convey a good story?
  • Storytelling as a process.
  • Clarity in storytelling.
  • What’s in it for me? Relevance in storytelling.
  • Why should manufacturers write?
  • Getting started: Connecting with your audience.
  • Common storylines: everyone is touched by manufacturing.
  • The importance of an editor.
  • Quality over quantity in writing.

Tools & Takeaways

This Week’s Superstar Guest: Christine Schmitz

Connect With MakingChips

Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify

Dec 28, 2018

The MakingChips podcast welcomes guest Tony Schmitz, professor at UNC Charlotte and assistant director, energy production and infrastructure center to talk about machining vibration. Tony teaches mechanical design, helping students design and build useful technology like robots. He also teaches mechanical vibrations, structural dynamics, and advanced manufacturing. He says, “At the end of the day, when you’ve made something, you never feel like you didn’t accomplish something that day.” During this episode, Tony gives helpful information about how to measure and mitigate machining vibration in manufacturing.

Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact

The 3 pieces of the machining dynamics puzzle

Why are machining dynamics important for manufacturing leaders? Knowing the variables within a tooling machine and being able to adjust them appropriately can increase the longevity of the tool and increase productivity. Tony Schmitz explains that there are three pieces of the machining dynamics puzzle. Listen as he explains why considering these three factors are essential for manufacturers.

Feel the machining vibration

Whenever a force is being applied to a nonrigid structure, there will be vibration. The problem, according to Tony, is that CAD/CAM software encourages you to ignore vibration and the variables within the machining tool. CAD/CAM always drafts the cutting process perfectly. However, it doesn’t take into account the reality of a machining tool that vibrates. Vibration means displacement of your cutter that changes over time. However, Tony says that the math equations you learned in school can actually be applied to the shop floor. Hear how differential equations can actually be used in CAD/CAM software to help get higher axial depths of cut without chatter.

Good vibrations v. bad vibrations

“Just like we all have fingerprints, every cut has a fingerprint as well and it’s the frequency content of that sound signal,” says Tony Schmitz. Bad vibration, also called chatter, are unmistakable when you hear it in a shop. Tony talks about how he can analyze frequencies that a machine puts out and identify bad vibrations and problems in the chip making process. He also explains how viewing wave patterns produced by a machine can tell you how to adjust your spindle speed. Tony says, “The most powerful knob on your controller is not the feed override, it is the spindle speed override.”

How to increase productivity in your shop

In order to mitigate bad vibration and increase your productivity, Tony encourages collecting a minimum set of data. He describes how to select the 8-10 standard tools that you use the most and collect data on those tools, using an impact, or tap test. Results from a tap test can help you bid jobs more accurately. They can also help you make adjustments to your machines so that you can avoid chatter and be more efficient. Learn about that and much more on this episode of MakingChips.

Here’s The Good Stuff!

  • Manufacturing News: A Detroit entrepreneur applies lean auto manufacturing principles to build a beauty salon
  • Introduction of guest Dr. Tony Schmitz, professor of at UNC Charlotte and Assistant Director, Energy production and infrastructure center
  • Tony explains the three pieces of the machining dynamic puzzle
  • How math and physics can be applied to the shop floor
  • Analyzing frequency data to identify bad vibrations within a machining tool
  • The correlation of feedback in a PA system and chatter in a milling tool
  • How a tap test can help you measure your tools data, make adjustments, and increase productivity
  • The pigskin professor and how Dr. Tony Schmitz put together videos for University of Florida football games

This Week’s Superstar Guest

Connect With MakingChips

Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify

Dec 22, 2018

On this week’s episode of MakingChips, guest Noah Goellner talks about lean process improvement for manufacturers. Noah is the Vice President of Continuous Improvement for Hennig Inc. He is also a lean expert with who presents lean practices in his role at Hennig and as a member of the board of directors of QRM. During this conversation with Jim and Jason, Noah shares why focusing on lean process improvement is important for manufacturers and how it can help transform their companies.

Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact

Why do manufacturers need to focus on lean process improvement

Manufactures should devote time to integrating lean into their companies for many reasons. There are cost saving benefits, improvement of throughput, better problem-solving skills and employee development and much more. Failure to have a lean process can put you behind the competition Noah says, “You can’t improve without changing and you can’t change without improving unless you are going the wrong way.” Listen as Noah explains the benefits of lean process improvement during this podcast.

How lean flows value to the customer

Success doesn’t begin on the shop floor. Most of what determines success happens upstream before the work ever reaches a machine. Quality engineering, supply chain, and employee development all determine whether or not your company can serve your customers well. Lean process improvement is all about flowing value to the customer by eliminating waste or white space, increasing efficiency and consistently improving in all areas of the business. Listen as Noah Goellner shares more ways that lean flows value to the customer.

How can you start implementing lean into your company?

As with any new process implementation, the key is to take the first step. You don’t have to wait until you have everything figured out. And you don’t have to do everything at once. Consider your pain points and areas of inefficiency and start with one challenge. Noah Goellner talks about taking a cata approach to solving problems. He encourages manufacturing leaders to avoid the shotgun approach and instead take a focused approach to implement lean.

Lean process improvement over the natural approach

Manufacturing leaders can fall into the habit of operating their companies under natural or organic processes and expectations. However, growth and improvement must be intentional. Noah explains that taking the natural approach allows you to work in your areas of strength while your weaknesses remain unaddressed. Lean process improvement can be an effective agent of change, especially in the areas of weakness. As you identify the challenges within the business, you can then start to implement strategies to change for the benefit of the company and the customers you serve. Hear all about that and more on this episode of MakingChips.

Here’s The Good Stuff!

  • Manufacturing News: Manufacturing’s mixed messages aren’t helping to close the skills gap.
  • Why do small machine shop owners need to devote time to implementing lean into their businesses?
  • How Noah Goellner defines lean and how it helps companies provide value to the customer
  • Real-world practices for implementing lean into your manufacturing business
  • How to work backward through the manufacturing process to set expectations and evaluate process to achieve those requirements.
  • What is cata and how does it help with problem-solving?
  • Noah Goellner shares some stories of success for companies have implemented lean processes.
  • What is the best reason for implementing a process rather than allowing it to happen naturally

Tools & Takeaways

This Week’s Superstar Guest

Connect With MakingChips

Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify

Dec 8, 2018

On today’s podcast, Jim and Jason share a very special announcement about MakingChips 2.0. Four years ago, MakingChips started with the goal of equipping and inspiring manufacturing leaders. The mission has not and will not change. However, what started as a hobby has now turned into something much more. And now there is an exciting new partnership that is going to take MakingChips to the next level. Listen to this episode to hear all about MakingChips 2.0

Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact

A strategic partnership that is reshaping the future for MakingChips

On this episode, Nick Goellner joins the podcast to reveal a new strategic partnership for MakingChips. Nick is the Marketing Director of Advanced Machine & Engineering and is now a Partner and Managing Director at MakingChips. He is joining the team to propel the company from a simple podcast to a media agency that can serve the metalworking nation. Hear about the bright new future that lies ahead for MakingChips and how you can be encouraged and equipped even more by joining the journey.

The impact of content marketing for manufacturers

Marketing has changed dramatically in the last twenty or thirty years. Companies used to talk to the consumer and tell them what they wanted. Now the key to marketing success involves interacting with your audience and talking with them, not at them. Content marketing isn’t a new strategy. Nick Goellner talks about how two companies that have leveraged it to help grow and solidify their brand. Listen to hear how content marketing can help your company expand its reach.

How do you build a brand?

How can you build your brand? Nick Goellner says that you build a brand by building an audience. That’s exactly what MakingChips has done over the last four years. By consistently creating quality content that educates your audience, you become a thought leader and expert in the industry. During this episode, Jim and Jason share with Nick how they have approached content marketing with MakingChips. They also discuss some of the exciting new opportunities that lie ahead.

The future of MakingChips 2.0

MakingChips has provided interviews, information and inspiration for the last four years. Realizing how challenging manufacturing can be led Jim and Jason to seek out wisdom and knowledge from other leaders. Now, MakingChips is becoming an agency to serve manufacturers so they can experience greater success through marketing. Utilizing video, written content, and the brand new Chip-In program, MakingChips will continue to strive toward the mission that has driven them from the very beginning.

Here’s The Good Stuff!

  • The big announcement of MakingChips 2.0 with a very special new partner
  • Manufacturing News: 2019 Manufacturing Content Marketing Benchmarks, Budgets and Trends report
  • The mission of MakingChips when Jim and Jason started and where it is today
  • Two classic examples of content marketing.
  • Nick shares the six steps of building a brand by building an audience.
  • How partnering with Nick will help MakingChips expand and grow.
  • Ways that the metalworking nation can be a part of encouraging and inspiring manufacturing leaders.

Connect With MakingChips

Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify

 

Nov 30, 2018

Jim and Jason are back in the studio to start their new series on process by talking about the Entrepreneurial Operating System. This podcast series on process is designed to help you evaluate your current processes and determine where in your company new ones can or should be implemented. During this episode, Jason talks about the EOS process and how he has applied it at Zenger’s Industrial, Black Industrial and Safety Supply, and at MakingChips. As they discuss EOS, Jason and Jim also give some helpful tips for starting your own process journey.

Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact

What is the Entrepreneurial Operating System?

EOS is a set of concepts and tools designed to help leaders and organizations get better. It includes the best business practices and process, combining them into a single system. EOS focuses on vision, traction, and health to help companies solve their problems and experience progress. Listen as Jason shares how the Entrepreneurial Operating System has benefited his teams during this podcast.

The 6 components of EOS

During this episode, Jim and Jason discuss the six components of the EOS. Each component is vital to growth and health. The first component is vision. Everyone in the company needs to know where you are going and how you are going to get there. Vision gives your company a common objective and defines success. EOS helps by giving eight questions for leaders to answer that will help them cast a vision.

Right people, right seat

The second component of the EOS is having the right people in the right positions on your team. In order to move forward, you have to have a team that is aligned with your core values. Hiring the right people first requires creating an organizational structure. Many companies structure their companies around the personalities already on the team. Jim and Jason talk about the importance of conflict management and solving problems methodically. Hear more about all 6 of the components during this episode.

How to implement a process like EOS

Knowing about a process like EOS isn’t enough. If you want to experience the benefit of such a process, you have to take a step and start implementing it. So how do you do that? Jim and Jason give some advice for how to begin utilizing a process like EOS. They also discuss how to experience the best results and how quickly change can happen. Be inspired to take a step in evaluating and upgrading your processes as you listen to this episode of MakingChips.

Here’s The Good Stuff!

  • Jason introduces the process system that he uses at Zenger’s Industrial Supply, Black Industrial and Safety Supply and at MakingChips
  • The process that Jim uses at Carr Machine & Tool, Inc.
  • Manufacturing News: Volvo upends U.S. manufacturing plans in reaction to China tariffs
  • 6 components of the Entrepreneurial Operating System
  • Having a vision that is compelling and well communicated
  • Getting the right people in the right position
  • The importance of gathering and utilizing data
  • Solving issues methodically
  • Running your business like a franchise
  • How are you achieving your vision on a weekly, monthly or quarterly basis

Tools & Takeaways

Connect With MakingChips

Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify

Nov 23, 2018

On this special Thanksgiving episode of MakingChips, the Metalworking Nation shares what they are thankful for. While Jason and Jim usually address the challenging issues that manufacturers deal with, on this episode they step back and make some space to express gratitude for the good things in life. You wrote in and shared what you were thankful for and many of those are read many on the show.

Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact

The struggle is real, but so are the blessings

Jason and Jim kick off the show by sharing the things they are thankful for. While they admit that there are difficulties and struggles in life, they have great perspective to know that in the grand scheme of things, they are blessed. Jim shares how he has learned to make adjustments in life and leadership and the difference that has created. Even small changes can have a huge impact. They also give credit to their wives for their grounding and success.

What would you be doing if not manufacturing?

Consider for a moment what you would’ve done for a career had you not gone into manufacturing? Where would you be if you hadn’t started in this challenging industry? During this episode, Jim and Jason discuss that very question. Listen as they both guess what they think the other would’ve done for a career. Thankfully, both Jim and Jason became leaders in the manufacturing industry and started encouraging and inspiring manufacturing leaders through the MakingChips podcast.

Giving thanks with fellow MakingChips listeners

On this episode, you will hear several members of the metalworking nation share about what they are thankful for. As you listen, take some time to think about how you might give thanks during this Thanksgiving season. Kaleb Mertz shares some of the email responses from MakingChips listeners and past guests. While not everyone could be featured, the ones that are shared on the episode are inspiring and encouraging.

The contagious gift of gratitude

One highlight of the episode comes from Steve Zenger, Jason’s dad. He wrote in to share his gratitude for his family and friends. You can hear the emotions and sentiment in his response. There are many other great submissions that include gratitude for co-workers and teams, technology, success in business and family. Listen to hear some great people giving thanks on this episode of MakingChips.

Here’s The Good Stuff!

  • Since it is Thanksgiving week, Jim and Jason talk about what they are thankful for
  • The metalworking nation shares what they are thankful for
  • Tina Carnelli, Marketing Manager at MP Systems feels blessed by working with people she likes
  • Bob Petrini, President of Chick Machine Company includes Making Chips in the list of things he is thankful for
  • Steve Zenger, Jason’s dad, shares with MakingChips the things he is thankful for
  • Todd Stukenberg is excited about robots and how they are making manufacturing safer and faster
  • Shaun Bisordi owner/machinist at Rocky’s Wire EDM is thankful for the social community of manufacturers
  • Matthew Guse is thankful to have been on MakingChips earlier this year
  • Michael Pulizzi says he is thankful for his wife

This Week’s Superstar Guest

  • All mentioned resources
  • LinkedIn Profile
  • Never share an email address

Connect With MakingChips

Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify

Nov 16, 2018

It’s time for you to start dialing in manufacturing processes that can revolutionize your business. Manufacturing is challenging. But MakingChips is here to help through every aspect of running and growing your business. One of the best ways to jumpstart productivity and success in your company is by evaluating and implementing processes. Manufacturers are inherently process-oriented people. Once you understand the processes you have and the ones you need to add, you are on the way to taking your company to the next level.

Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact

The new MakingChips series

Edwards Deming said, “If you can’t describe what you are doing as a process then you don’t know what you are doing.” Needless to say, processes are important. MakingChips is launching a series on the podcast that is all about dialing in processes for manufacturing leaders. Over the next few weeks, Jim and Jason will address how you market and sell, how you produce and how you manage your finances. Upcoming episodes will include discussions about the most critical areas of business that manufacturing leaders deal with every day.

Facing your fear of processes

Even the thought of processes for some manufacturing leaders can seem daunting. You may feel like you don’t have the time or bandwidth to deal with them because you are trying to run a business. Jim and Jason talk about the 3 Ps of running a successful company, which includes people, product and process. Each one of the three legs of the business stool is important. Failure to address one can lead a gap in your company that could cost you money and opportunity. However, optimizing core manufacturing processes can take your business leadership to the next level. The new MakingChips series will help you face your process fear.

Steps to elevate processes for success

What do you do once you’ve decided to jump in and start evaluating the value of manufacturing processes in your company? What are the steps to improvement? During this episode, Jim and Jason share how to implement core processes. One of the keys is to involve a team of people so that you aren’t trying to bear the load alone. Jim even encourages the smallest shops to get together weekly to talk about the difficulties and areas of growth in their shops.

Dialing in your manufacturing processes with MakingChips

So many companies have unwritten processes that are guiding their operations daily. Those undocumented processes can be streamlined. You can start dialing in manufacturing processes by beginning at the 30,000-foot view and zooming in as you get more comfortable. The purpose of the upcoming series is to help ignite the flame in manufacturing leaders to start implementing processes in their companies. Doing so can propel you to greater levels of success.

Here’s The Good Stuff!

  • Jason and Jim introduce a new series on the podcast that will address manufacturing processes
  • What are the steps to implementing processes in your shop
  • Is not having a process and indication that you don’t have confidence in what you are doing?
  • The process checklist
  • How to start evaluating and implementing processes in your company

Connect With MakingChips

Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify

 

Nov 2, 2018

Welcome to the MakingChips IMTS2018 wrap up podcast, recorded live from the final day of the show with guests Larry Turner, President and CEO of Hannover Fairs USA and Peter Eelman, Vice President of Exhibitions & Business Development at AMT. After a long and exciting week, Jim and Jason reflect on some of the trends and themes that emerged from the show and discuss some of the takeaways for manufacturing leaders. IMTS2018 proved that it is an exciting time to be in the manufacturing industry.

Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact

IMTS’ commitment to the next generation

The future of manufacturing lies in the hands of young men and women who have not even graduated high school yet. Investment in next generation leaders is critical to seeing continued success in the manufacturing world. IMTS2018 displayed its commitment to students this year, drawing over 20,000 student registrations. The entire lower level of the C hall was devoted to students, including exhibit space and conference rooms. Students are increasingly interested in the unique machinery and technology that makes up modern manufacturing.

How IMTS broke the record

This year, there were over 130,000 registered attendees, an all-time record for IMTS. Why did so many people come to this event? Even though manufacturing is challenging, it is also seeing unprecedented growth. IMTS is capitalizing on the momentum that the rapid growth and change of the industry is ushering in. Peter Eelman describes how he sees the industry changing and how that change is having a positive impact on manufacturing in the United States.

The manufacturing atmosphere is changing

Upon reflection, IMTS proved to be a great representation of manufacturing as a whole. There was an excitement and energy at this year’s show that is prevalent throughout the entire industry. Peter Eelman believes that there is a sea change in attitude and culture. He says, “There is going to be continued growth in U.S. manufacturing. There is a desire to make things locally and closer to home.” He also thinks that shows like IMTS will stem the tide in the skills gap and will continue to foster interest in the industry.

We are just getting started

IMTS is meant to serve as a catalyst for manufacturing leaders. The real work begins when you get back home and start building a strategy for how to implement necessary adjustments for future growth. Both Peter Eelman and Larry Turner encourage manufacturing leaders to focus on learning. Mobilize your team to learn as much about the technology and opportunities on the horizon so that you can start implementing changes effectively.

Here’s The Good Stuff!

  • Introduction of Larry Tuner, President & CEO of Hanover Fairs Inc, and Peter Eelman, Vice President - Exhibitions & Business Development at AMT -The Association for Manufacturing Technology
  • With over 130,000 attendees at IMTS, Peter Eelman describes what it means both to him and the manufacturing industry
  • The theme of IMTS and how it was seen throughout the show
  • What do metalworking leaders need to do to educate students on the opportunities in manufacturing?
  • Will the skills gap increase or decrease in the next 24 months?
  • How a culture of collaboration is emerging in the manufacturing industry
  • What is one actionable step that manufacturers can take when they go back to work after IMTS

Tools & Takeaways

This Week’s Superstar Guest

Connect With MakingChips

Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify

Oct 26, 2018

Jim and Jason are live from IMTS2018 Day 5 with guests Jim King, Andrew Benson, and Meghan West to discuss industry 4.0 and its impact on the metal-working nation. How does a machine tool manufacturer, tooling manufacturer and a CAD/CAM company work together to elevate a manufacturing business? What is industry 4.0? Listen to this episode to hear the panelists discuss their perspective on Industry 4.0 and how collaboration is driving innovation.

Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact

How collecting data can make you better

One of the benefits of Industry 4.0 for manufacturers is the ability to collect data and increase both speed and efficiency in their shop. Jim King says that Industry 4.0 means collecting data and then analyzing it to improve the quality of manufacturing. Ultimately, data collection can help business owners make good decisions. Jim also shares the benefit of interfacing with the end user to understand their needs so that his company can build better tools.

Connectivity and integration are 2 keys for Industry 4.0

For Meghan West, President at CNC Software, Industry 4.0 is about connectivity and integration. Without a machine tool, the software that her company creates is useless. However, pairing the software with the tool allows users to optimize their experience. Throughout the panel discussion, the theme of collaboration emerges as everyone discusses the benefit of integration and shared information.

Variability is the enemy of quality in manufacturing

Andrew Benson says that Industry 4.0 is allowing Iscar Metals to eliminate variability through digitization. Using indexable tools has increased the precision and predictability so that the quality of the work coming from a manufacturing floor is better. He shares the value of repeatability and how reconditioned tools might become obsolete because of the unwanted variability they introduce. Just like the other panelists, Andrew Benson sees collaboration as an important component of manufacturing. He says, “to support the factory of the future, a company can’t be an island unto itself.”

Collaboration that fuels innovation

In the past, companies were very secretive about the machines they were building. Rather than working together, they considered competitors to be threats to their success. However, there has been a shift in the manufacturing world that now encourages collaboration. Companies are working together, sharing data and solving problems together to push innovation forward. Industry 4.0 is leading to more collaboration that is propelling the manufacturing industry.

Here’s The Good Stuff!

  • Introduction of guests Jim King, Andrew Benson, and Meghan West
  • What is Industry 4.0 and what does it mean for the manufacturing industry
  • How is CAD and CAM merging and how does that impact the end user?
  • What is possible by connecting a cutting tool technology with a machine tool?
  • Does the machine tool builder design differently based on the advancements in manufacturing software
  • How does a machine tool builder connect all of the complementary products to deliver maximum value to the end user?
  • The ways R&D has changed because of industry 4.0

This Week’s Superstar Guest

Connect With MakingChips

Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify

Oct 19, 2018

Live from IMTS 2018 day four in Chicago, Jason and Jim are joined by Barry Walter, Dietmar Goellner, Craig Zoberis, and Teresa Beach-Shelow to give their insight and advice that will help manufacturers sleep better at night. There are so many decisions and challenges that manufacturing leaders face that it is sometimes hard to get a good night’s sleep. The four panelists draw from their extensive wisdom and experience to share how you can handle some of those challenges so that you can sleep better tonight.

Handing over the keys to the kingdom

One issue that keeps manufacturing leaders up at night is succession planning. Manufacturers want to see their business last beyond them. How can you structure your company so that it will run well even if you are no longer the top leader? Barry Walter is a third-generation manufacturer who, despite swearing he’d never work for his father, is now in business with all four of his brothers in his father’s business. Dietmar Goellner is a second-generation manufacturer who has the third-generation working in his business. Listen as all four panelists discuss their succession plan experience and how they are planning to pass along their businesses to the next generation.

Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact

How company culture impacts the bottom line

Teresa Beach-Shelow says, “Core values pour out the front door.” It’s true, culture is everything. It guides how you make decisions, how you serve your customers and how you treat employees. Craig Zoberis says, “If we take good care of our people, they will take good care of our customers.” Especially with the generation of millennial workers who want to be a part of something bigger than themselves, you have to clearly define the why in your company. Creating a great company culture takes massive amounts of time and energy. But will it translate to more profit? Hear what the panelists have to say about that topic and much more during this episode.

The technology that is shaping businesses

Technology can be a double-edged sword. New machinery and tools can keep your business relevant and give you the competitive edge over the competition. It can also be daunting, hard to understand, and a challenge that keeps manufacturing leaders up at night. During this panel discussion, each guest talks about how they approach technology and how it is defining their businesses. Find out from them how to sleep better at night by using technology to your advantage.

A marketing and sales strategy to help you sleep better

Companies used to have teams of salesmen that went business to business trying to sell products or services. It was a simple strategy, but one that wasn’t always effective. Marketing and sales has changed dramatically over the past few years. It is critical for manufacturing leaders and business owners to think about how they are developing their brand. While it can be overwhelming to understand the different marketing avenues, there are tools and resources available today that can help. Listen as the four panelists discuss their marketing and sales experience and give tips for how you can have a better marketing strategy for your company.

Here’s The Good Stuff!

  • Introduction of the four panelists at IMTS 2018 day 4
  • How to implement a succession plan for your manufacturing business
  • How long does it take to activate a succession plan?
  • Does investing in a company’s culture produce profitability?
  • In what ways is technology shaping your company?
  • How the marketing and sales environment has changed in your company?
  • The 4 panelists give their final advice for how manufacturers can sleep better

This Week’s Superstar Guest

Connect With MakingChips

Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify

Oct 6, 2018

During this episode of MakingChips, Jim and Jason talk with Tim Thiessen, Vice President of Sales and Marketing at Okuma America Corporation about the core values and culture of OKUMA. This conversation happened at IMTS2018 where that unique culture was on full display. OKUMA has been around for 120 years. During this conversation, Tim shares how their values influence how they serve customers. He also gives his vision for the future of manufacturing. You don’t want to miss this episode of MakingChips.

Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact

How core values impact customer interaction

Long-term successful companies with strong core values are the ones that last over time. This is certainly true of OKUMA. OKUMA has a saying, “The criticism of one is more valuable than the praise of millions.” OKUMA takes customer engagement seriously. Their tagline is “Passionately pursuing customers for life.” Tim Thiessen shares how that impacts sales and customer interaction. He says, “In sales, you want to be as close to your customer as possible.” Hear Tim share how they apply that in their sales approach and strategy during this interview.

A customer-centric culture that stands the test of time

Trust is the foundation on which strong relationships are built. This is true in marriage and in business. In order to be effective in sales, you have to build trust with your customers. Tim Thiessen believes that the best way to earn trust is by showing genuine empathy. Rather than just selling a product, Tim stresses that you want to understand your customer. You need to know not only their machining needs but also the challenges of the customers business. Creating that kind of transparent relationship isn’t easy. It takes time, but it is worth it for a long-lasting, mutually beneficial relationship. When you have a culture so obviously dedicated to the customer, you earn business not just for one purchase, but for a lifetime.

Investing in manufacturing for long-term benefits

What sets OKUMA apart is their dedication to the core values and culture. The people who work for OKUMA love the manufacturing industry. They want to see the industry continue to thrive and are actively investing in it. They are dedicated to quality, making reliable machinery that will last. They are also on the cutting edge of technology, creating new machines with open platforms that provides flexibility and connectedness for machine shops. For Tim, he is most excited about the additive and subtractive opportunities. Listen as he shares his excitement for the manufacturing industry and the future during this conversation on MakingChips.

How AI will shape the future of manufacturing

There is so much potential for the future of manufacturing. As the market continues to grow, so will the opportunities for employment and technological advancement. Already, technology is outpacing the workforce in manufacturing. Tim Thiessen shares his vision for the future of manufacturing and how AI will play a significant role in the way machinery works. If you haven’t already begun to consider how to position yourself to adapt to AI technology, then now is the time. Hear more about the advantages of AI and other exciting innovation on this episode.

Here’s The Good Stuff!

  • Manufacturing News: 5 ways industrial AI is revolutionizing manufacturing
  • Introduction of Tim Thiessen, Vice President of Sales and Marketing at Okuma America Corporation
  • OKUMA’s tagline is “Passionately pursuing customers for life.”
  • The role of empathy in successful leadership
  • What percent of the machine tools that OKUMA sales is to repeat customers?
  • The core value of passion and how it impacts customer engagement
  • How Tim Thiessen got started in the manufacturing industry.
  • What the term “open possibilities” means in the OKUMA culture.
  • Tim Theisen is most excited about the additive technology and the connectedness of machinery
  • The machine tool technology of the future for which manufacturers should be preparing

Tools & Takeaways

This Week’s Superstar Guest

Connect With MakingChips


Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify

Oct 1, 2018

Live from IMTS 2018, Jim and Jason talk with Steve Kline, Director of Market Intelligence at Gardner Media Business, Inc. to answer the question “does manufacturing data matter?” Steve has generated forecasts for his family owned business and for the metalworking and plastic industries. Gardner Media Business produces media for the durable goods manufacturing industries.

Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact

The current reality of manufacturing by the numbers

During the interview, Steve Kline gives his assessment of the manufacturing industry. There has been a renaissance in manufacturing over the last few years. Steve says that he is surprised at the current trajectory of the industry. In the best way possible, the market isn’t following a typical pattern, with the machine market seeing growth for nearly eight years in a row.

Why does data matter to manufacturers?

Steve will be at MTForecast to talk to manufacturers about data related to machine tool spending, types of machinery and the buying market specific to location and company size. He explains that data matters because it helps you budget for machine tool pricing. Knowing the supply and demand of a particular tool will help you know whether prices are negotiable or if it is a seller’s market As a buyer of machine tools, data can help you plan, budget and manage expectations.

What machine tools are in demand?

In his company’s research, Steve Kline says that they look at six specific areas of tooling data including turning, machining centers, grinding, screw machines, and EDM. Every category is expected to experience growth in the next year. Horizontal machining centers are in particularly high demand. Even though they are a more expensive option, they better meet the needs of manufacturing customers. Listen as Steve explains the other areas of machine tool growth during this interview.

How can a leader interpret manufacturing data as an evaluative tool?

While it is widely accepted that data is important for business leaders, how to use that data is not always as clear. How accurate are the numbers? How are leaders to interpret the data in a way that helps guide their decision making? Steve Kline offers some advice on how to leverage the information that their research delivers. His main message is to focus on trends and not on individual numbers. Looking for patterns can help owners make educated decisions that will positively impact their future stability and growth.

Here’s The Good Stuff!

  • Manufacturing News: Manufacturing Day is Friday, Oct. 5
  • Introduction of Steve Kline, Director of Market Intelligence at Gardner Media Business,Inc.
  • The current manufacturing market
  • What does the data matter and what does it tell about the manufacturing industry?
  • What machine tools are in demand right now and which machines can be found on a bargain?
  • How should manufacturing leader interpret the data as an evaluative tool
  • How accurate has Gardner Media’s forecast been over their 40 year history?
  • How can manufacturers be prepared in the event of another economic downturn?

Tools & Takeaways

This Week’s Superstar Guest

Connect With MakingChips

Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify

Sep 27, 2018

MakingChips is back with another live podcast from IMTS 2018. On this episode, Jim and Jason discuss what’s on the manufacturing horizon with guests Lonnie Love, Jay Rogers, and Adrian Allen. During times of rapid growth, long-term thinking can easily take a back seat to the next urgent task. Many manufacturing leaders lack the ability to see beyond the immediate future to think more clearly about manufacturing a decade from now. On this episode, hear the prophets of manufacturing share what they envision our industry will look like in 10 years.

Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact

How automation is transforming the future of manufacturing

Automation and digitization isn’t the future. It is the present. However, automation will greatly impact the future of manufacturing. Panelist Jay Rogers says, “Digital manufacturing is all about being able to improve the speed of design and delivery of a part.” The impact will be most obvious in the automotive industry. It is a huge segment of manufacturing, drawing two and three-tier companies to develop and manufacture parts that are used in the industry. Hear the panelists discuss how autonomy is driving innovation in manufacturing.

What does the machine shop of the future look like?

A shop floor has a reputation for being dark and dirty. That’s not the reality in the present and it certainly isn’t true for the future machine shop. So what will the future shop floor look like? Lonnie Love says he envisions the future machine shop to be microfactory that can make anything. The flexibility that technology is opening up for companies is allowing them to diversify the products they can make. Adrian Allen adds that he sees a future where the whole factory floor is that actual machine tool bed, where the machines come to the part rather than the part going to the machine.

Changes manufacturers need to make today to be a part of the future

In order to prepare for the future of your company, you have to consider the customer of the future. The desire for on-demand solutions is the norm. Manufacturers must start building machines that can meet their futures customers needs. Leaders also have to begin considering their workforce. Adrian Allen says that recruiting talent is a key. Having machines that can do amazing work but lacking the talent of engineers will make those great machines irrelevant. The workforce is critical and there is a skills gap that must be addressed. Listen as the panel discusses ways to address the skills gap with practical ways to recruit and develop talent.

Future challenges and opportunities for the manufacturing industry

The future is both scary and exciting. Innovation and technology have increased the pace to such a degree that manufacturing leaders can’t afford to resist change. The time to consider the future and make preparations to adapt is now. Prepare to take some risk so that you don’t get left behind. Listen as the panelists give some final tips for how to do just that. They discuss the impact of future recessions, how to integrate sustainable and environmentally friendly, energy efficient processes, and how to help change the perception of manufacturing to attract the next generation of talent. Be inspired as you listen to this episode of MakingChips.

Here’s The Good Stuff!

  • Introduction of panelist Lonnie Love, Jay Rogers and Adrian Allen
  • How is the advent of autonomous vehicles going to affect the manufacturing industry?
  • What does the machine shop of the future look like
  • What changes do manufacturers need to make now so that they can be a part of the future of manufacturing
  • Ways to address the skills gap in manufacturing
  • Economic predictions about how a recession might affect manufacturing
  • How does sustainability and environmental consciousness impact manufacturing and the legislation around it?
  • How manufacturing leaders need to think differently about their human resources in order to keep the right people in the right seats in their company
  • The panel gives their final word to manufacturing leaders

Tools & Takeaways

This Week’s Superstar Guest

Connect With MakingChips

Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify

Sep 23, 2018

On Wednesday at IMTS 2018, Jason and Jim hosted a panel including Aisha Rasul of Socistory, Corey Koepnick of Badassmachinists and Tom Fetcho, Vice President of Operations at MariTool to discuss social media management for manufacturers. Should manufacturers be using social media to market their businesses? If so, how does a company use it to their advantage? The panelists discuss these and other important questions during this live panel discussion on MakingChips.

Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact

The first thing you can do to get started using social media

Aisha Rasul is the founder and CEO of Socistory, a company that creates a compelling and integrative social media presence for brands. She encourages manufacturers to consider how social media management might help them accomplish their companies mission and vision. She explains that, rather than using platforms haphazardly, manufacturing leaders should first develop a strategy for how to most effectively and efficiently leverage social media. Having a plan will also help companies know which platform will best serve them in accomplishing their goals.

Which social media platform is best for your company?

There are multiple social media platforms on the market. Each one provides unique opportunities for interaction and engagement. Which platform should manufacturers use? According to the panel on this episode, the key lies in knowing what format best showcases your work and knowing where your community is most involved. Corey Koepnick, who has developed a huge following on Instagram showcasing his manufacturing expertise, chose that platform because it is image-based, which allows him to share beautiful photos of the interesting things he is making. It was also the platform where he was finding the most influencers in his manufacturing niche.

Measuring your social media management ROI

With any marketing strategy, you want to be able to track your effectiveness. Social media is a growing marketing tool in which companies are investing more time and money. There are two ways you can leverage these platforms, either organically or through an ad spend. During this discussion, the panel gives some helpful insight on how to measure return on investment. If you are just beginning to use social media, it is important to note that it takes some time to build a community and see results. Honing in on your target audience will help you see a better conversion rate through social media.

The endgame of social media management for manufacturers

Tom Fetcho is the Vice President of Operations at MariTool. He has taken his background and skills in graphic design to start a social media presence for his company. Tom showcases video and content of products being made. He encourages manufacturers to know the endgame for using social media. He also says that you should participate and engage with other companies rather than just focusing on yourself and your own content. With as little as twenty minutes a day, you can begin to see the impact of social media management in your manufacturing business. Listen to this episode of MakingChips to hear more.

Here’s The Good Stuff!

  • The impact of social media on a business and brand awareness
  • Introduction of guests Aisha Rasul, Corey Koepnick and Tom Fetcho
  • Why Corey started Badassmachinsts and how he has grown his Instagram page
  • What is the first thing a manufacturing company can do to get started with a social presence?
  • How Tom grew from being in operations to handling marketing and social media
  • The panelists explain the different platforms and how and why they use them
  • Understanding the terminology related to social media
  • How do you measure the impact of social media engagement?
  • Are there any platforms that a company should avoid?
  • How to manage your connections on the various platforms
  • How much time should you spend on social media marketing?

Tools & Takeaways

This Week’s Superstar Guest

Connect With MakingChips

Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify

Sep 14, 2018

On this episode of MakingChips, Jim and Jason broadcast live from IMTS with their guest panel including Jess Giudici, Titan Gilroy, Federico Sciammarella and Toni Neary to discuss solving the skills gap in manufacturing. The manufacturing industry has a problem. There is not enough talent to fill the current job opportunities in the United States. Whether it is through raising awareness, providing education or focusing on recruiting, the challenge has to be addressed so that the talent pipeline is replenished with qualified workers. Listen to this great discussion with some of the world’s best and brightest manufacturing leaders.

Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact

Manufacturing doesn’t have a perception problem

Jason and Jim start by asking Toni Neary how to change the perception of manufacturing among high school and college students so they consider it a career path. Toni responds by saying that manufacturing doesn’t have a perception problem, but rather an awareness problem. Solving the skills gap requires educating students about the various career opportunities within the industry. Toni discusses some of the ways that she is helping change the conversation through educational avenues to increase that awareness.

How to change your culture to attract talent

The upcoming generation of workers and potential employees want to do work that matters. They also want to pursue a career that offers development and advancement opportunities. How can the manufacturing industry capitalize on this kind of motivation and drive? Jess Giudici says that companies are going to have to adapt their organizational structures and developmental opportunities to start solving the skills gap. While the typical perception of manufacturing is a dark, dingy shop floor, that is not reality. Exposing students and potential employees to a meaningful culture is one way to start solving the skills gap.

Solving the skills gap by changing the curriculum

Titan Gilroy says that his business model of offering a free CNC academy online is adapting to the need in the industry. He currently has 45,000 students in 170 companies going through his academy. Titan says that In order to be successful you have to be highly skilled with the ability to make a high quantity of parts with precision and speed. Titan says the curriculum being taught in educational institutions needs to be elevated to match the type of technology and work being done in manufacturing. Listen as Titan explains how his disruptive model helps to better train students to have confidence in doing highly skilled work.

Tips for making your company more appealing to talent

Manufacturing is all about solving problems. It’s a challenging industry that is facing unprecedented growth and an unsustainable shortage of workers. What can you do to change the trajectory of the manufacturing industry? The panel offers several tips for how they can begin solving the skills gap in their local communities today. From investing in local education to defining the culture and identity of your company, manufacturing leaders can start making an impact. Changing the perception of manufacturing and raising awareness about career opportunities starts at the local level. Listen to the entire panel discussion to be equipped and inspired to make a difference in your company and community on this episode of MakingChips.

Here’s The Good Stuff!

  • Jim and Jason broadcast live from IMTS with four panelists to talk about solving the skills gap
  • Introduction of panelists Jess Giudici, Titan Gilroy, Federico Sciammarella and Toni Neary
  • What perceptions need to change in order to bring the future manufacturing leaders into the industry?
  • What changes should manufacturing business make to their culture to attract talent to their company?
  • How does higher education need to change so that graduates will begin their manufacturing careers with more of a practical skill set?
  • Why Titan is disrupting the industry by giving away education through his academy
  • How can the attendees of IMTS help to raise the awareness in a practical way
  • In what ways is Northern Illinois University helping to place students into manufacturing jobs
  • Tips on how companies can change their cultural awareness
  • Tactics to diminish the negative perception of manufacturing as if it is an old-school profession
  • How manufacturing leaders can get involved in their local communities to help solve the skill gap

Tools & Takeaways

This Week’s Superstar Guest

Connect With MakingChips

Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify

Sep 7, 2018

On this episode of MakingChips, Rob Sattler talks about how his family business took manufacturing from the farm to the shop floor. Rob is the Vice President of Sales, Estimating and Engineering at Sattler Inc in Ira, Michigan. He comes from a family of manufacturing with both his father and grandfather being involved in metalworking. Rob tells his story, his manufacturing background and how is carrying on the family legacy today.

Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact

How to turn a barn into a machine shop

Rob Sattler’s father started his machine shop in the barn of his dairy farm. Having been in the manufacturing industry prior to starting the dairy farm, his dad began to purchase and repair old machines. Thanks to his dad’s entrepreneurial spirit and ingenuity, Rob’s father decided to start using those machines. In 1994, Sattler Inc was born. What started as a family business has become a highly successful manufacturing company that has grown from the farm to the shop floor known as Sattler Inc. Listen as Rob shares the story of how Sattler Inc. began and how they are flourishing still today on this episode of MakingChips.

The 3 most impactful lessons learned in manufacturing

Through challenges and growth, there are three guiding principles that Rob Sattler has learned. The first has to do with the inevitability of change. Whether you like it or not change happens to everyone in every industry. With the rapid advancements in technology, leaders can now expect even more change at a much faster rate. What do you do if you are change-averse? Rob Sattler’s advice is to get over it. He suggests that manufacturing leaders should learn to love change. If you don’t adapt to the demands of the market, your competition will and they will either put you behind or out of business altogether. Continuous growth, training, and adaptation are essential to being successful.

Get the Best Tools

New tools and machinery can be expensive. Not only do you have to consider the cost of the machine, but also the time and training it takes to implement the new machine. However, Rob Sattler suggests that you can’t afford to not have the best tools. Though the upfront cost might be more, having the right tools in place in your shop will eventually pay for itself in both production and customer acquisition. Listen as Rob talks about the importance of having the best tools during this interview.

The case for program management in manufacturing

In order to take a company from the farm to the shop floor, there has to be great management in place. Program management is like conducting an orchestra. You can have the greatest talent and the finest tools but if you aren’t giving direction then your business will suffer. Coordinating training of your employees with the utilization of the best tools and engineering is essential in serving your customers well and having a successful manufacturing company. Hear all about that and more on MakingChips.

Here’s The Good Stuff!

  • Manufacturing News - The ISM manufacturing index exceeded all estimates showing positive signs for the economy
  • Introduction of Rob Sattler, VP Sales, Estimating, Engineering at Sattler Inc
  • Rob Sattler tells how his father started a family machine shop from his dairy farm barn
  • How Sattler weathered the economic ups and downs through the years
  • Sattler Inc has grown through the years, now specializing in powertrain system assemblies
  • Rob Sattler shares the three most impactful lessons he’s learned while being in the manufacturing industry.

Tools & Takeaways

This Week’s Superstar Guest

Connect With MakingChips

Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify

Sep 6, 2018

On this episode of MakingChips, Peter Eelman returns to talk about the last minute preparations for IMTS 2018. Peter is the Vice President of Exhibitions & Business Development at AMT. He is also the Senior Executive in charge of the International Manufacturing Technology Show, one of the top three trade shows in the United States. Listen to this interview to hear Peter talk about what you can expect at IMTS 2018 and how you can make the most out of this incredible event.

Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact

The scope and scale of IMTS 2018

IMTS is just around the corner, running September 10-15, 2018. Peter Eelman and the other organizers of the event are already starting to get McCormick Place in downtown Chicago ready for the show. By the time the event opens, about 5,000 transfer trucks worth of equipment will have been unloaded onto the 1,370,256 square foot exhibit floor. Having done so many of these shows has helped the IMTS crew get more efficient at setting up a seamless show. You don’t want to miss all there is to see at IMTS 2018.

The top technology trends to look for at IMTS 2018

When asked what the top technology trend you should look for at IMTS 2018, Peter Eelman has a one-word answer - connected. He says that there is a different approach to manufacturing on the horizon through connect factories and digital transformation. In the interview, Peter mentions a surprising new technology partnership that will be on display at this year’s show. At IMTS, you will not only learn about the cutting edge of manufacturing technology, you’ll also learn tips and tricks on how to apply that technology in your company.

How this year’s show will be different from IMTS in years past

Because of how the IMTS organizers have developed the show through the years, and because of the fast rate of technological change, IMTS 2018 promises to be a show unlike any other. Manufacturing is flourishing, so there will be opportunities to purchase machinery right from the exhibit floor. Peter Eelman says “There’s not a lot of machinery that leaves IMTS back to the source that it came from. It goes to customers.” However, even with all of the changes, IMTS is staying true to its original roots as a machine tool science fair.

Expect to have some fun at IMTS

While IMTS is about learning and getting better for the sake of your company, there is also ample opportunity to have fun. In years past, there have been 3D printed cars and houses. This year you will have the opportunity to utilize and experience what was recently considered future technology. One of the most fun things you can do is join Jason and Jim every day at Noon on the main stage at the Grand Concourse. Listen to help make your last minute preparations for IMTS 2018.

Here’s The Good Stuff!

  • Manufacturing News: While the manufacturing industry is doing great, leaders should continually prepare themselves to be recession-proof
  • Introduction of Peter Eelman, Vice President Exhibitions & Business Development at AMT
  • How the IMTS team prepares for the setup of McCormick Place for the upcoming show
  • Peter shares the technological trends that will be displayed at IMTS
  • What kind of fun can be expected at IMTS
  • The food that you should try while in Chicago according to Peter Eelman
  • Sandvick Coromant Silent Tools plus dampened tools for long overhang machining
  • Jason and Jim give the guest schedule for their time at IMTS

Tools & Takeaways

This Week’s Superstar Guest

Connect With MakingChips

Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify

  • Tag attributes
  • Make plain text

 

Aug 24, 2018

On this episode of MakingChips, Jim interviews his son Ryan Carr, Operations Manager at CARR Machine and Tool, Inc. along with Paul Van Metre, Co-Founder of ProShop ERP, about the risk and reward of implementing a new ERP system. During the interview, Ryan shares about the decision-making process and how they have been applying the new, full-spectrum ERP called ProShop. Listen as Ryan and Paul explain why an ERP is so important and how you can start the process of implementing one in your business.

Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact

Taking the Plunge Into a New ERP System

Prior to purchasing the new ERP system, Ryan explains that there were inefficiencies and redundancies at CARR Machine and Tool, Inc. Data entry required multiple steps with numerous papers being unnecessarily shuffled around the office. Knowing that something had to be done to move the company forward, Jim and Ryan called in Paul Van Metre to explain how ProShop could help them. Hear how implementing the new ERP system is significantly minimizing redundancy and increasing efficiency.

Becoming the Metal-Working Nation’s Premier ERP System

Paul Van Metre was an experienced manufacturer prior to developing ProShop. He ran his own machine shop and experienced great success. His business grew to the point that they needed a better way to manage the company's data. After searching and trying other ERPs, Paul and his team decided to build their own program. ProShop was originally intended only for internal use, but after a customer asked to purchase their proprietary software, Paul knew they had a product that the metal-working nation needed. Listen to the story of how ProShop became the premier ERP system in the manufacturing market during this episode of MakingChips.

The Benefits of an ERP System in Your Company

Paul Van Metre says, “The economy drives off of taking raw materials and turning them into high-precision, value-added products. You can’t run an economy just making lattes and selling insurance.” Manufacturing is important, but it’s also challenging. An ERP creates a centralized place where all files are stored and easily accessed. Implementing an ERP can help streamline your processes, keep you organized and efficient, and better position you for success in your market.

Assessing the Risk and Reward for Your Company

Running your own manufacturing business can be difficult. Companies need as many tools as possible to help them be successful. Big, expensive decisions aren’t easy, but if you don’t change today, you’re competition will. You have to be willing to adapt and try new things to stay relevant in the market. Jim and Jason encourage you to analyze your company to see where you can reduce redundancies and inefficiencies. Listen to this week’s episode to learn more about how an ERP system can benefit your company.

Here’s The Good Stuff!

  • Manufacturing News: The $717 Billion Dollar National Defense Authorization Act and how it impacts manufacturing
  • How Zenger’s is working to increase efficiency and throughput utilizing a new ERP system
  • Jim introduces his son Ryan Carr, Operations Manager at CARR Machine and Tool, Inc.
  • Ryan shares how he approached the idea of changing ERP system after using the previous one for 20 years.
  • Introduction of Paul Van Metre, Co-Founder of ProShop ERP
  • Paul Van Metre shares how he launched ProShop through an organic process
  • Ways the ProShop is helping CARR Machine and Tool, Inc. become more efficient
  • How ProShop integrates ISO and AS9100 to organize procedures, certifications and quality systems
  • Ryan shares his personal and company goals for utilizing ProShop

Tools & Takeaways

This Week’s Superstar Guest

Connect With MakingChips

Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify

Aug 11, 2018

This week on MakingChips, guest Michelle Edmonson, Senior Director of Exhibitions Operations and Marketing at AMT, explains the value of IMTS for job shops. Job shops are typically smaller manufacturing companies that often handle custom orders for small or medium-sized companies. This year, IMTS will be focusing on job shops by offering opportunities tailored specifically to these companies. Listen to this episode to hear all about how job shop owners and manufacturers can reap the benefit of attending IMTS 2018.

Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact

Why focus on job shops?

Michelle Edmonson explains that in years past IMTS hasn’t had a particular focus. However, job shops as a community make up over 25% of the spend in the manufacturing world. Realizing the important role that these manufacturers play, IMTS leaders decided to survey local job shop owners to discover their needs. The results led IMTS 2018 to focus on job shops, offering specialized opportunities for smaller manufacturers to learn and grow throughout the week.

The 3-step program for job shops at IMTS 2018

If you’ve been to IMTS before, then you know that there will be a lot of exhibits. In fact, there are over 2400 exhibitors, displaying the finest in manufacturing innovation and technology. These exhibits are also step one in a three-step program for addressing the unique challenges that job shop and precision machine companies face. Michelle Edmonson explains how many of the exhibits focus on the best business practices of top job shops from around the country and how attendees can see and learn from these manufacturers.

There is so much you can learn at IMTS

Beyond just the exhibits, IMTS is offering special learning opportunities for job shop owners as well. There are three specific sessions that attendees should consider, starting on Wednesday morning. These courses are the second step in the three-step program focusing on job shops. During the episode, Michelle Edmonson details the schedule and cost for attending the conference sessions. She also highlights the topics of discussion and the value they will bring to job shop manufacturers.

A huge prize giveaway at IMTS for job shops

The final step in the IMTS 2018 job shop focus is a chance to win a great prize from one of the event’s sponsors. ESAB is offering a welding and cutting garage shop package tailored specifically for precision machine companies. Michelle gives the details of this fantastic package and explains how you can be entered in the giveaway. Only attendees of one of the special conferences offered at IMTS will be eligible. Listen to the interview to hear more details about that and much more.

Here’s The Good Stuff!

  • The case for why small, precision machining companies should go to IMTS
  • Manufacturing News: Asbestos is now being allowed back into manufacturing
  • Jim and Jason address the concern about crime in Chicago for IMTS attendees
  • Introduction of Michelle Edmonson, Senior Director of Exhibitions Operations and Marketing at AMT
  • The focus of IMTS 2018 is on job shops
  • The three step program that IMTS is offering job shop owners and manufacturers
  • Michelle Edmonson explains the opportunities offered through learning sessions
  • In order to be a top shop, you have to focus on culture
  • IMTS is a great way to learn how to run your manufacturing business better

Tools & Takeaways

This Week’s Superstar Guest

Connect With MakingChips

Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify

Aug 3, 2018

On this episode of MakingChips, Jim talks with Jason Lesniewicz, Director of Cultural Tourism at Choose Chicago, about the best way to experience Chicago. Jason leads Choose Chicago’s cultural tourism strategy positioning as a global, cultural destination to increase visitation and achieve the annual goal of 55 million visitors as set forth by mayor Rahm Emanuel, which they achieved in 2017. Listen to this conversation for ideas and tips on how to enjoy Chicago when you come to IMTS in September.

Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact

The Chicago neighborhoods that set it apart

Chicagoans love their city. Jason Lesniewicz grew up in Chicago and has lived there his entire life. He shares the best way to experience Chicago by describing the unique neighborhoods that set the city apart. From McCormick Place convention center you can either walk or take a short taxi or Uber ride to get to several of these neighborhoods. From Wrigleyville to the West Loop to the Gold Coast, each one provides great dining, entertainment, and cultural opportunities.

3 restaurants you should try in Chicago

Chicago is known for its fantastic food. No matter what you’re craving, you can find it somewhere in Chicago. Jason Lesniewicz shares his top three favorite restaurants. He says the West Loop is the best neighborhood for the Chicago dining scene. He suggests Randolph and Fulton Streets as a great place to start. The area was part of the old warehouse district that has seen a fantastic renovation with great restaurants. The best part about grabbing a bite to eat in the West Loop is that it is only about a mile away from McCormick Place.

The best way to experience the cultural opportunities Chicago offers

IMTS will be in Chicago in mid-September, which is a beautiful time of year. The humidity begins to drop and the average temperature is in the mid-70s. It will be a great time to experience Chicago and the different cultural opportunities the city has to offer. Chicago is known for its signature layout around the river as well as for its incredible architecture. There are many theaters that often feature off-broadway and pre-broadway shows. During September, there are three sports teams that will be in season, including the Cubs, White Sox, and Bears. During your stay in Chicago, you will want to be sure to explore the many cultural opportunities. Listen as Jason and Jim share more about the city you don’t want to miss during this episode.

3 experiences you can’t miss during your visit to Chicago for IMTS

With all that Chicago has to offer on top of the vast IMTS exhibit space, it might be difficult to decide what experiences you’re going to take in while in Chicago. Just as you should with IMTS, planning ahead is key for making the most of your time experiencing Chicago. Jason and Jim narrow down their top 3 favorite experiences. From sightseeing tours, river cruises and a ride on the Centennial Ferris Wheel, to catching a game at historic Wrigley Field, hear their 3 recommended experiences and make your plans accordingly.

Here’s The Good Stuff!

  • Manufacturing News: National Association for Manufacturers chief Jay Timmons is touring America to hear from the manufacturing nation around the country
  • What can you expect when you come to Chicago
  • Introduction of Jason Lesniewicz, director of Cultural Tourism at Choose Chicago
  • The diversity and cultural richness of Chicago’s neighborhoods set it apart as a tourist destination
  • Jason gives advice for the best neighborhoods to seek out when you come to Chicago for IMTS
  • Three best restaurants you should check out in the west loop Chicago
  • River North is the old manufacturing neighborhood that has a lot of entertainment
  • Highlights of Chicago for the first time visitor
  • Jason recommends sightseeing options to get the best views of Chicago
  • Three things not to miss in your visit to Chicago for IMTS

Tools & Takeaways

This Week’s Superstar Guest

Connect With MakingChips

Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify

Jul 27, 2018

This week on MakingChips, Peter Claus talks about the whirlwind of leadership he experiences in his manufacturing job. Peter is the CNC supervisor at HFW Industries in Buffalo, New York where he has worked for over 20 years. He is also one of this year’s IMTS Rock Stars. Peter shares his passion for manufacturing, how he has grown in his company and how he deals with the challenges of being a leader.

Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact

Finding and following your passion

Peter Claus seemed destined to work in the manufacturing field. While on a track to pursue an engineering degree in college, Peter had the opportunity to operate a lathe. It was a pivotal moment that led him to change directions and pursue a manufacturing career. He started at HFW in 1994 running a lathe machine. HFW specializes in hardfacing and thermal spray coatings. Listen as Peter talks about how his passion for manufacturing and how it has led to his success during this interview.

Are you hungry enough to grow?

As HFW expanded and grew, more opportunities for leadership were presented to Peter. One contributing factor to Peter’s success is his constant hunger to learn and grow. He found a passion in manufacturing and he pursued it, increasing in education and company responsibility. He has always been interested in learning the different facets of manufacturing which has led to a breadth of experience. His hunger ultimately led him to where he is now as the CNC supervisor at HFW and one of this year’s IMTS Rock Stars.

2 Keys to Surviving the Whirlwind of Leadership

With increased responsibility comes the inevitable whirlwind of leadership. Every leader will experience the effects of the whirlwind while juggling the daily demands of the job. Even the best plans and intentions can be derailed when unforeseen issues arise. Peter talks about the challenges of his supervisory role. Leading well requires prioritizing daily objectives while remaining flexible to handle issues as they arise. He gives 2 keys to surviving the whirlwind of leadership that he applies at HFW. Peter’s insight is encouraging and practical for any manufacturing leader.

Taking advantage of all the IMTS has to offer

What can a manufacturing leader do to escape the whirlwind of leadership? One great way to recharge is by attending IMTS. During this conversation, Peter shares how he plans to take advantage of IMTS this year. In addition to doing research on specific machines and spending time in the cutting pavilion, he plans to leverage the week as a vacation, bringing his wife and enjoying some of the great Chicago food. Peter encourages manufacturing leaders to experience IMTS and dream about the potential of taking your company to the next level.

Here’s The Good Stuff!

  • Emotional intelligence prevents you from overreacting or escalating issues that arise in business
  • Manufacturing News: Being a conscious capitalist, caring for your employees and being fair
  • Introduction of Peter Clause, CNC supervisor at HFW Industries and one of this years IMTS Rock Stars
  • HFW does thermal coatings and hard face welding
  • As a supervisor, Peter is required to deal with both machine and people issues
  • How HFW is trying to overcome the workforce problem
  • What Peter is excited about at IMTS this year and what he plans to research while he’s there
  • The key to Peter’s success in the manufacturing industry
  • Make your plans to be at the IMTS Grand Concourse stage each day at noon to see Jim and Jason

Tools & Takeaways

This Week’s Superstar Guest

Connect With MakingChips

Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify

Jul 20, 2018

This week on MakingChips, Jason asks Jim whether or not you really need a 5-axis machine. Every manufacturing company owner has to determine the right time to add a new piece of machinery to his or her shop. That decision isn’t always easy. More often than not, there are multiple good options that leave the leader with the daunting task of determining the best choice. Jim explains to Jason his rationale for a recent purchase making decision for Carr Tool and Machine and gives advice for making a big purchasing. Hear all that and more on this episode of MakingChips.

Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact

2 main factors that can help you make decisions about machinery

When considering a big purchase of machinery for your shop, the decision largely depends on two factors. The first factor is what you currently make. Know your current customer demand and your ability to meet that demand. If you are having trouble with turn-around or customers are continually leaving your business because you can’t meet their demand, it might be time to upgrade to a new piece of machinery. The second factor is how will your company grow in the future. Considering what technology you need to integrate into your company to allow for growth and expansion will help you make a wise purchase.

Buying a 5-axis machine should be a need-based purchase

After originally planning to buy a 5-axis machine last summer, Jim recently purchased a 4-axis Mazak 500mm twin table horizontal machining center with full fourth axis machining capability. He explains that while he was unable to complete the deal on the 5-axis machine the 4-axis machine has served him well. He has been able to meet customer needs with the 4-axis horizontal machine. Jim also expressed that he hasn’t had the need for a 5-axis machine. When considering a machine tool purchase, Jim advises letting need be a key determining factor. Buying a piece of equipment that you already have a need for ensures that you get an immediate return on your investment.

How to make a good purchasing decision

It is difficult to balance the tendency to resist change with moving forward too quickly. The danger is that you purchase a piece of machinery that won’t give you a quick return on investment. It is wise to introduce technology incrementally. Jim encourages leaders to utilize the wisdom and experience of your team to help make educated decisions for your company. He also suggests reaching out to your customers to see if they need the kind of work that would justify purchasing a 5-axis machine.

Will a 5-axis machine make or break your company?

Not having a 5-axis machine will not keep Carr Machine and Tool from being competitive in the long run. While Jim chose not to buy the 5-axis machine yet, he will definitely be looking to purchase one in the near future. Knowing the plan for future growth and expansion gives Jim a head start in finding the skilled labor or training current employees so that they can run the machine effectively. Jim and Jason would love to hear from you. Have you purchased a 5-axis machine? If so why?

Here’s The Good Stuff!

  • It is better to have a well placed fan than having an oscillating fan
  • Buying new technology requires you to balance risk and reward
  • JIm shares his excitement about a new relationship with an aerospace customer
  • Manufacturing News: Machine Metrics shares shocking machine utilization numbers
  • Jim shares his reasons for deciding not to buy a 5-axis machine
  • Though it wasn’t a 5-axis Carr Machine and Tool did add a new piece of equipment in the shop
  • Buying a machine should be based on the production needs you currently have
  • Jim shares the impact of 5-axis machines could have for his company
  • Jason and Jim ask for your feedback about 5-axis machines

Tools & Takeaways

Connect With MakingChips

Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify

Jul 13, 2018

The growth and impact of manufacturing tomorrow depends on the next-generation leaders you are investing in today. During this episode of MakingChips, Greg Jones, Vice President of Smartforce Development at AMT, discusses how he is trying to help reduce the skills gap that exists in manufacturing. He also gives some practical ways that manufacturing leaders can join in the cause of raising up next generation leaders.

Connect with us:www.MakingChips.com/contact

What is the cause of the skills gap?

While previous generations grew up in manufacturing and joined the family business, the future of the manufacturing workforce will not come about in the same way. Many high school graduates only consider traditional college as a post-secondary option. There are approximately 400,000 manufacturing jobs that are currently unfilled because of a lack of skilled workers. In order to reduce this gap, an educational shift must happen. Greg Jones shares how apprenticeships can help create this shift while helping students secure a solid career in manufacturing.

Bridging the skills gap by investing in education

The Smartforce Student Summit started at IMTS in 1988 with the goal of giving students an in-depth look at the opportunities the manufacturing industry offers. It also helped to educate teachers and administrators about the importance of investing in this workforce. 30 years later, the Smartforce Student Summit is continuing to build that legacy. Greg Jones is leading Smartforce Development at AMT to help meet this significant need by exposing alternative opportunities to these students. During this episode, he shares how he is investing in education in order to help build tomorrows manufacturing workforce.

Unlocking the potential of next-generation leaders

While there is change happening on a national level thanks to new legislation and an increased focus on manufacturing, real change occurs on the local level. Greg Jones shares several ways that manufacturing leaders can make an impact. He encourages advocating for STEM programs. He also suggests partnering with local school systems and volunteering in technology programs. This face-to-face interaction can help change the trajectory of a child’s life and could unlock the potential of a next generation leader in manufacturing. Greg also encourages manufacturers to bring a student to IMTS to enjoy the Smartforce student summit.

How to share the opportunities that exist in manufacturing

There have been many news stories suggesting that new technology and robots could reduce the number of job opportunities in the manufacturing industry. Greg Jones says instead that automation is actually creating jobs. IMTS and the Smartforce Student Summit are designed to share those opportunities with next-generation leaders. Students from over 40 states will be exposed to apprentice competitions where high school and college students will show in a tangible way what a career in manufacturing could look like. Listen to MakingChips to hear the entire conversation with Greg Jones.

Here’s The Good Stuff!

  • Jim gives an update on what is new at Carr Machine and Tool
  • Good employees will gravitate to companies with compelling mission and vision
  • Manufacturing News: Inmates in at a prison received manufacturing certificates
  • Introduction of Greg Jones, Vice President of Smartforce Development at AMT
  • Smartforce is seeking to bridge the skills gap through education and workforce development
  • Greg advocates for high school and college students to consider an apprenticeship program instead of traditional college
  • The importance of the relationship between local manufacturing companies and schools
  • How the future of manufacturing might be impacted by the current skills gap
  • What to expect from the Smartforce Student Summit at IMTS this year
  • Local manufacturing leaders can make an impact in their community by getting involved in local schools

Tools & Takeaways

This Week’s Superstar Guest

Connect With MakingChips

Subscribe to Making Chips on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or Spotify



1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Next » 7